reveal

(redirected from revealment)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

a magician never reveals his secrets

Said by someone who does not wish to divulge or explain something (not necessarily an actual magician). A: "What did you put in this sauce? It tastes even better than usual!" B: "Ah, a magician never reveals his secrets." Mommy, I tried to ask the magician how he did that trick, and all he would say is, "A magician never reveals his secrets."
See also: never, reveal, secret

reveal (one's) (true) colors

To reveal what one really believes, thinks, or wants; to act in accordance with one's real personality, character, or disposition. Primarily heard in US. Dave said all along that he only wanted this deal because it was in the company's best interest, but he revealed his true colors once he realized that he wouldn't get any special commission for his efforts. It's only in times of crisis that your friends will really reveal their colors.
See also: color, reveal

reveal (one's) (true) stripes

To reveal what one really believes, thinks, or wants; to act in accordance with one's real personality, character, or disposition. (A less common variant of "show one's (true) colors.") Dave said all along that he only wanted this deal because it was in the company's best interest, but he revealed his true stripes once he realized that he wouldn't get any special commission for his efforts. It's only in times of crisis that your friends will really reveal their stripes.
See also: reveal, stripe

reveal (one's) cards

To make one's plans, intentions, ideas, or resources known to others, especially those that were previously hidden or kept secret. (Also expressed as "reveal (one's) hand"; both phrases refer to displaying one's cards ("hand") during a card game.) In business negotiations, it's important that you don't reveal your cards right away, or you might risk losing out on the best deal possible. Pressure from the government is forcing the notoriously secretive CEO to reveal his cards regarding his company's tax profile and offshore accounts.
See also: card, reveal

reveal (one's) hand

To make one's plans, intentions, ideas, or resources known to others, especially those that were previously hidden or kept secret. (Also expressed as "reveal (one's) cards"; both phrases refer to displaying one's cards ("hand") during a card game.) In business negotiations, it's important that you don't reveal your hand right away, or you might risk losing out on the best deal possible. Pressure from the government is forcing the notoriously secretive CEO to reveal his hand regarding his company's tax profile and offshore accounts.
See also: hand, reveal

reveal to (someone or something)

1. To disclose, divulge, or make known something to someone or some group. A noun or pronoun is used between "reveal" and "to." I revealed my new strategy to the board of directors, but they weren't nearly as receptive to it as I'd hoped. A magician should never reveal her secrets to anyone.
2. To show or display some concealed person or thing to someone or some group; to expose someone or something to the view of another person or group. A noun or pronoun is used between "reveal" and "to." The film never reveals the killer to the you, instead allowing you to draw your own conclusions. He pulled back the curtain and revealed the new product to the excited audience. The masked vigilante promised to reveal himself to the public once the city's crime rate was under control.
See also: reveal, to

show (one's) hand

To make one's plans, intentions, ideas, or resources known to others, especially those that were previously hidden or kept secret. (Also expressed as "show (one's) cards"; both phrases refer to displaying one's cards ("hand") during a card game.) In business negotiations, it's important that you don't show your hand right away, or you might risk losing out on the best deal possible. Pressure from the government is forcing the notoriously secretive CEO to show his hand regarding his company's tax profile and offshore accounts.
See also: hand, show
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

reveal someone or something to someone

to show or disclose someone or something to someone. The magician opened the door of the cabinet and revealed his assistant to the audience. I revealed my secret to no one. She stepped out from behind the tree and revealed herself to the hostess.
See also: reveal, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

show/reveal your ˈhand

(British English) (American English tip your ˈhand) do something which reveals your intentions, plans, etc: The problem is that we can’t say anything to the management without showing our hand, and we wanted to be able to take them by surprise.In court a good lawyer never reveals his hand too soon. OPPOSITE: keep/hold/play your cards close to your chest
These expressions refer to showing your cards (= your hand) in card playing.
See also: hand, reveal, show
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Engaged pedagogy warrants the vulnerability of the teacher/professor via revealment of personal lived experiences in connection with the subject.
The authors were mindful of the challenges of recall and revealment embedded in the construction of memoir.
necessary to initiate such revealment in an authentic and genuine way.
teacher/professor revealment has the potential to change the way teacher
In fact, hooks insist that initial revealment come from the
such revealment of by the teacher/professor is a comfortable position
continue to participate in such revealment as a means of effective
After she makes "partial revealments" of her Voices under torture, de Conte says Joan "seemed to me to state as facts things which were but allegories and visions mixed with facts" (896).
In her first interrogation, she refuses to answer (875); later, she is tortured and makes "partial revealments" (896), but these are not specified.
Comprised in a series of Revealments from Organized Associations in the Spirit-Life, through John Murray Spear (Boston: Office of Practical Spiritualists, 1857), I, 158.