reveal to (someone or something)

(redirected from revealing ourselves to)

reveal to (someone or something)

1. To disclose, divulge, or make known something to someone or some group. A noun or pronoun is used between "reveal" and "to." I revealed my new strategy to the board of directors, but they weren't nearly as receptive to it as I'd hoped. A magician should never reveal her secrets to anyone.
2. To show or display some concealed person or thing to someone or some group; to expose someone or something to the view of another person or group. A noun or pronoun is used between "reveal" and "to." The film never reveals the killer to the you, instead allowing you to draw your own conclusions. He pulled back the curtain and revealed the new product to the excited audience. The masked vigilante promised to reveal himself to the public once the city's crime rate was under control.
See also: reveal, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

reveal someone or something to someone

to show or disclose someone or something to someone. The magician opened the door of the cabinet and revealed his assistant to the audience. I revealed my secret to no one. She stepped out from behind the tree and revealed herself to the hostess.
See also: reveal, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
We are constantly revealing ourselves to each other through our movement; learning from and teaching each other without even trying.
Readers will feel the urgency of Ferry's project according as they are persuaded with him of the truth that all claims to truth are but perspectival, revealing ourselves to us more than any "object" they are about, and of the probative force Ferry seems to impute to the depth-psychological destruction of all idealisms, where all our "higher" things turn out to be forms of "lower" things, and in the end, of the forces of nature as known by the empirical sciences.
Selecting and arranging words as well as revealing ourselves to be certain sorts of persons are matters of 'style'...styles can be 'personal' or 'impersonal,' 'literal' or 'ironic,' 'plain' or 'elevated,' even 'philosophical' or 'poetic'; such labels refer to particular combinations of vocabulary, sentence syntax (arrangement), and images of the speaker.