retire

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Related to retires: Retirees

retire from (something)

To give up, withdraw from, or conclude one's office, profession, or career permanently, as due to one's age or health. I retired from my job when I turned 65, but I've been doing some consulting work for the company in my retirement to earn a little extra money. I retired from boxing years ago. I'm just a coach, now. He was forced to retire from public office after the scandal.
See also: retire

retire in (something or some place)

1. To relocate to some city, state, country, etc., when one retires. I know it's a cliché, but I'd love to retire in Florida. More and more people are retiring in Ireland, now that it's economy is back on track.
2. To move into a particular kind of living arrangement when one retires. My parents sold our big family home and retire in a small apartment off the coast of Spain. I have no intention of retiring in some old folks' home, thank you very much.
3. To enter into a particular situation or set of conditions upon one's retirement. I had the misfortune of retiring in a floundering economy, so my investments were either not making as much as I'd been counting on, or else were outright losing money. After working so hard all my life, I'm looking forward to retiring in a life of rest and relaxation.
See also: retire

retire into (something or some place)

1. To move into a particular kind of living arrangement when one retires. My parents sold our big family home and retired into a small villa off the coast of Spain. I have no intention of retiring into some old folks' home, thank you very much.
2. To enter into a particular situation or set of conditions upon one's retirement. I had the misfortune of retiring into a floundering economy, so my investments were either not making as much as I'd been counting on, or else were outright losing money. After working so hard all my life, I'm looking forward to retiring into a life of rest and relaxation.
3. To withdraw to some location in order to rest or seek seclusion. Ah, what a wonderful meal. Shall we retire into the drawing room, everyone? He retired into a corner of the room, overwhelmed by the number of people at the party.
See also: retire

retire on (some amount of money)

To have a certain amount of money in one's savings or pension on which one will survive during retirement. I've been putting together a sizable nest egg to retire on once I turn 65. More and more people are finding out that you can't realistically retire on the state-funded pension alone.
See also: amount, of, on, retire

retire to (something or some place)

1. To relocate to some city, state, country, etc., when one retires. I know it's a cliché, but I'd love to retire to Florida. More and more people are retiring to Ireland, now that it's economy is back on track.
2. To move into a particular kind of living arrangement when one retires. My parents sold our big family home and retire to a small apartment off the coast of Spain. I have no intention of retiring to some old folks' home, thank you very much.
3. Withdraw to some location in order to rest or seek seclusion. Ah, what a wonderful meal. Shall we retire to the drawing room, everyone? He retired to a corner of the room, overwhelmed by the number of people at the party.
See also: retire

retire from something

to withdraw from something. (Usually to terminate a working career permanently.) I retired from the company early. When do you intend to retire from your job?
See also: retire

retire (in)to something

to quit working and move into something or some place. Sam and Ella retired into a Florida condo. Joe did not want to retire to Florida.
See also: retire

retire on something

to quit working and live on something or a particular amount of money. I already have enough money to retire on. I cannot retire on a sum like that!
See also: on, retire

retire someone or something from something

to take someone or something out of service permanently. The company retired the vice president from the job and gave it to someone else. It is time to retire my automobile from service.
See also: retire

retire to

some place to quit working permanently and move to a particular location. When I quit working, I want to retire to Florida. We will retire to our place in the country.
See also: retire
References in periodicals archive ?
Smith was so comfortable that his clients were well transitioned that he elected to retire after year three.
With all the talk about privatizing Social Security, it's almost certain that there will be some changes to the system before you are ready to retire. Whatever you receive from Social Security will most likely not be enough to pay your expenses.
"I don't know that I would want to ever fully retire, but I would like to be financially secure by age 55," says Spencer, who defines financial security as having the ability to travel and not worry about how to pay the bills.
TAKE LIFE CHANGES INTO CONSIDERATION IF YOU WANT TO RETIRE WELL
"Reportedly, 54% of men in their 50s and early 60s work after retirement," says Randy Thurman, a CPA and financial planner in Oklahoma City, who notes that retirees under 65 in 1997 could earn up to $8,640 without losing any Social Security benefits.
Some retirees find it helps them maintain a routine and a sense of purpose in their lives as well.
If your regular (age 65) benefit would be $1,000 per month, for example, you'd receive only $800 monthly if you retire at 62.
Some retirees ask themselves if the new generation of CPAs has what it takes to keep their firms going.
"With unfunded plans, retiring partners cash in their share of this value by receiving payments after they retire."
The key disadvantage of unfunded retirement plans is that, for one reason or another, the money may not be there when partners retire. Younger partners may balk at the prospect of having to pay for senior partners' retirement, or they may leave the firm and take clients with them, putting the firm in a precarious financial situation.
In December 1993, for instance, Los Angeles County's Thomas Tidemanson was able to retire from his $158,000 a year job as director of public works with an annual pension of $190,000.
One hundred percent of federal retirees and roughly 50 percent of state and local retirees get them every year, automatically, while only about 1 percent of private retirees do.
Retirees like Hall deserve protection, but the federal retirement plan gives COLAs to everyone--former clerks and millionaires alike.
A worker may retire earlier or later than the normal retirement age of 65.
The PIA for early retirees is reduced by .56% for each month of entitlement before normal retirement age; the maximum reduction is 20%, for retirement at 62.