resonate with

(redirected from resonates with)

resonate with

1. To carry the sound of some lingering acoustical force. The entire house resonated with the sound of his music. The streets resonated with gunfire, keeping residents in a perpetual state of fear.
2. To be in agreement, harmony, or conformity with something else. It seems suspicious that the notoriously authoritarian country is suddenly proposing a peace agreement that resonates so closely with what the global community has been requesting. The description of the course really resonated with what I wanted in a Medieval English Literature class.
3. To produce or evoke an appealing feeling of familiarity in someone. The show has achieved such huge success because its themes resonates with adults and children alike. It's clear that the book series has been resonating with readers around the country.

resonate with someone

Fig. [for an idea, issue, or concept] to appeal to someone or cause someone to relate to it. The concept of wearing worn-looking clothing seems to resonate with young people. Your notion just doesn't resonate with the public in general.

resonate with

v.
1. To sound with some particular tone: The house resonated with the final chime of the grandfather clock.
2. To correspond closely or harmoniously with something: My ideas for the film resonated with what the producers had in mind.
3. To evoke a feeling of shared emotion or belief with someone: His book mostly resonated with young adults.
4. To feel shared emotions or beliefs with something or someone: Everywhere she speaks, millions resonate with her message.
References in periodicals archive ?
Underground country duet Pete Krebs and Leslie Beia, also known as The Earnest Lovers, present Sing Sad Songs, a music collection that resonates with the hardy pace of outdoor life.
* What business they are “really” in: How do you communicate your business clearly, persuasively and in a way that resonates with any individual who is a prospect or customer from their point of view?
resonates with the authors' insight into cosmology, divine prophecy and manifestations, and the complexities of human relationships.
A masterful introduction to the heavens, Ridpath's work resonates with the beauty, complexity, and majesty of his subject.
Cherishing the friends old and new made within China's lands, as well as giving testimony to the efforts of programs and hospitals of the past and present to treat diseases, eradicate opium, slavery, and famine, and improve the quality of life, Closing The Circle resonates with the author's love for China's land its people.
The question that always resonates with me, for a variety of industries is.
The emphasis will be on supporting our multi-issue organization under a more focused umbrella that resonates with the public perception of the League.
From the inner demons of alcoholism and domestic violence to the travails of a high school teacher trying to help kids on the edge of life and death make something of their lives, Stomp and Sing resonates with empathy, understanding, and the cutting-edge struggle to survive.
This new insight resonates with Democratic populists, like me, who are frustrated by conservatives' use of deceptive language to malign Democratic ideas and erode American values while Democratic leaders appear powerless to defend them.
The new pavilion will be clad in red marbles and granites composed in a pattern that resonates with the scale and character of the original museum's existing Victorian facades.
Simple, sketchy color illustrations add a heartwarming touch to this delightful storybook, which resonates with Christmas spirit all year round.
Considering the book's many allusions to the 1960 film Breathless (which starred Jean-Paul, the Belmondo referred to in the book's title), it still resonates with the attitudes of many gay youth today.
The climactic scene, in which Benoit rides in a sleigh with his drunken uncle and the body of a dead youth, resonates with Canadian cultural mythology, the snowstorm an indication of the tempestuous winds of change about to come.
They argued the narrative that most resonates with Americans involves the rescue from evil of a helpless group by a powerful outsider who eventually disappears.
DeBose shows us two things: one, that in order to construct a message that resonates with the listener(s), the educated, middle-class African American female orator whom he observes invokes 'Standard Black English'; and, two, that the status of the individual and her multilingual abilities indicate the potential for a purposeful use of dialect regardless of the "stigma attached to non-standard speech." However, for DeBose, the discussion of Standard Black English focuses on the "autonomous grammar" of the dialect.