rescue from (someone or something)

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rescue from (someone or something)

1. To liberate or deliver someone or something from a dangerous or threatening person, thing, place, or situation. A noun or pronoun is used between "rescue" and "from." She managed to rescue the hostages from the gunman without anyone getting hurt. The government sent their best agents to rescue the wounded soldiers from the enemy prison.
2. To liberate someone from legal custody or imprisonment by forcible means. A noun or pronoun is used between "rescue" and "from." The cartel rescued the crime boss from the federal prison by blasting through the rear wall with dynamite. We'll rescue him from the sheriff when they move him from the courthouse to the county jail.
3. To cause someone to no longer have to deal with an undesirable person or situation. Give me a call if you need me to come rescue you from the dinner party. My friends and I have a signal we give when one of us needs to be rescued from some jerk at the bar.
4. To save something from an undesirable situation or outcome. The huge investment rescued the company from bankruptcy. The consultants are trying to rescue the project from the various mismanagement it has seen since its inception.
See also: rescue
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

rescue someone or something from someone or something

to save or liberate someone or something from someone or something. I hoped that someone would come and rescue me from this boring person. Nothing can rescue us from the ravages of time.
See also: rescue
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
Two men were awarded parchments from the Liverpool Shipwreck and Humane Society after rescuing someone from drowning.
It would be nice to imagine that, while on their highly-paid jolly in our capital, some of this army of police actually did something useful: rescuing someone from a local river, helping break up some late-night aggro, assisting in a drugs raid, patrolling late-night Valley Lines trains - or maybe just cracking down on uninsured drivers as they gazed down on the M4.
"Whether it was stopping someone with a gun on a submarine, rescuing someone from very dangerous quick-sand, all the stories are incredible.
In 1994, he was awarded a medal for rescuing someone from a submerged vehicle in Lake Whalom.
"But we're here and ready to help should the worst happen and, as always, we'll do everything we can to make sure that we get the best outcome - whether that be rescuing someone from a mountain or transferring a seriously ill person to hospital."
"Sometimes, we're rescuing someone from isolation because they don't have family coming to see them.
How does a twenty-first century child fare in rescuing someone from the redcoats?
He was always rescuing someone from divorce, bankruptcy, school failure, or criminal indictment.
During June's floods in Hull and Sheffield, a firefighter rescuing someone from a flooded ditch is thought to have contracted a virus from contact with the water.
These things take up a lot of our time when the firefighters could be rescuing someone from a real fire, or cutting them out of a car, for example.
When the individual is subject to a risk similar enough to that of the potential victim, she will generally favor the imposition of a liability rule (although not with respect to the specific rescue situation at hand).(58) As discussed under Hasen's model, this condition is met when [p.sub.1] [is greater than] C/V + C), where p, represents the potential rescuer's probability of being subjected to a similar harm, V is the value of her own life, and C is the cost of rescuing someone from the harm.(59)