require (someone or something) to (do something)

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require (someone or something) to (do something)

To demand or stipulate as obligatory that someone or something to something. The law requires you to disclose any and all assets held in foreign banks. We require all our guests to sign a waiver before going on the ride.
See also: require, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
Reason discovered the struggle for existence, and the law that requires us to oppress all who hinder the satisfaction of our desires.
Such were the incidents that led to this extraordinary increase in the family of Judge Temple, where, having once established the youth, the subject of our tale requires us to leave him for a time, to pursue with diligence and intelligence the employments that were assigned him by Marmaduke.
True love is radical because it requires us to see ourselves in all people.
Our religion, or leaving that aside, even conscience, requires us to support oppressed people physically, or at least verbally.
requires us to create ideas in different modes, in different channels
IT might appear that Mr Cameron wishes to stay in an EU, that requires us to continue to pay taxes to subsidise French farmers, and for the remainder of our industries to comply with overseas directives written by our competitors.
Thus, to do this requires us to answer their queries in depth and then provide them with techniques that engage their curiosity daily.
And we've added enough oil and gas pipeline to circle the entire Earth and then some." "Now, getting these clean energy industries to locate here requires us to maintain a national commitment to new research and development," the president said.
This day and age of striving for self-sufficiency requires us to have more and more hands-on knowledge.
Trading requires us to understand and respect risk, but not become paralyzed by it.
It requires us to take advantage of Lebanese living and working abroad.
But Facebook, which requires us to think about other people and be part of a group, helps us get smart.
Cardinal Karl Lehmann said in the newspaper Bild that the period of 40 days before Easter in the Christian calendar "requires us to rethink our lifestyle."