require

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Related to requirable: requires

desperate times require desperate measures

Extreme and undesirable circumstances or situations can only be resolved by resorting to equally extreme actions. Derived from the proverb, "Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies." I know that the austerity measures introduced by the government during the recession are unpopular, but desperate times require desperate measures.

drastic times require drastic measures

Extreme and undesirable circumstances or situations can only be resolved by resorting to equally extreme actions. Derived from the proverb, "desperate diseases must have desperate remedies." I know that the austerity measures introduced by the government during the recession are unpopular, but drastic times require drastic measures.

leap of faith

1. An acceptance of or willingness to do something based largely or entirely on one's faith that it is correct or will work, despite having little or no evidence or assurance thereof. It will be quite the look of faith for us to trust an outsider to run the organization, after the family has maintained control for over 100 years. I feel a bit wary that people seem so eager to make a leap of faith about driverless cars being free to drive in our streets.
2. In video games, a jump that the player's character is forced to make when the player is unable to see where they will land. Because the game doesn't offer any control over the camera, there are a number of occasions where you have to take a leap of faith and just hope for the best.
See also: faith, leap, of

require (something) from (someone or something)

1. To demand or stipulate as obligatory that someone or something provide, submit, or turn over something. The law requires a signed disclosure from each member of the board of directors. The bank requires collateral from all business taking out loans.
2. To have a necessity or requisite provided by someone or something. There are many people in the region who require the help of the government. I require more from life than just a roof over my head and three meals a day.
See also: require

require (something) of (someone or something)

To have a necessity or requisite provided by someone or something. Typically used when the required thing is vague or unspecified ("from" is more often used after "require" when the thing is specified). There are a few things we require of you before we can begin processing your information. We're still a little unclear as to what is required of us in this arrangement.
See also: of, require

require (someone or something) to (do something)

To demand or stipulate as obligatory that someone or something to something. The law requires you to disclose any and all assets held in foreign banks. We require all our guests to sign a waiver before going on the ride.
See also: require

*leap of faith

Fig. acceptance of an idea or conclusion largely on faith. (*Typically: be ~; make ~; require ~.) We had to make quite a leap of faith to accept his promise after the last time he let us down.
See also: faith, leap, of

require something from someone

to demand something from someone. The telephone company required a deposit from John and Martha before they would install a telephone. They required some help from us.
See also: require

require something of someone

to expect or demand someone to give or do something. I require absolute loyalty of my employees. What is required of me in this job?
See also: of, require

leap of faith

A belief or trust in something intangible or incapable of being proved. For example, It required a leap of faith to pursue this unusual step of transplanting an animals' heart into a human patient .
See also: faith, leap, of

leap of faith

The act or an instance of believing or trusting in something intangible or incapable of being proved.
See also: faith, leap, of

leap of faith

A belief or trust in something or someone that has no basis in past experience or fact. It is often applied to technological breakthroughs, as in “It took a real leap of faith for the first astronaut to step out on the Moon.” A Boston Globe article by Thomas Oliphant quotes Senator Edward Kennedy discussing a Supreme Court nominee: “The confirmation of nominees to our courts should not require a leap of faith. Nominees must earn their confirmation by providing us with full knowledge of the values and convictions they will bring to decisions. . . .” (Sept. 29, 2005).
See also: faith, leap, of