reproach (someone or something) with (something)

(redirected from reproach herself with)

reproach (someone or something) with (something)

To accuse someone, oneself, or some group or organization of something; to blame someone, oneself, or some group for something. My mother reproached me with laziness after I failed to get top marks on my exam. He didn't speak to the woman in the end and later reproached himself with cowardice. The federal court formally reproached the banks with plunging the economy into recession,.
See also: reproach
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

reproach someone with something

to rebuke someone with reference to something. I wish you wouldn't continue to reproach me with things that happened long ago. She was reproached with something out of the past.
See also: reproach
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
The Abraham Lincoln had nothing to reproach herself with, she had done her best to succeed.
As soon as breakfast was over, she sat down to fulfil her promise to Miss Tilney, whose trust in the effect of time and distance on her friend's disposition was already justified, for already did Catherine reproach herself with having parted from Eleanor coldly, with having never enough valued her merits or kindness, and never enough commiserated her for what she had been yesterday left to endure.
He no longer doubted that she had "nothing to reproach herself with," however peculiar and inexplicable her conduct might seem.
- that's all very well," said Athenais, "but that is not the sin Mademoiselle de la Valliere has to reproach herself with. The actual sin is sending poor Bragelonne to the wars; and to wars in which death is so very likely to be met with." Louise pressed her hand over her icy brow.
Examining the depths of her conscience, she found nothing to reproach herself with, and this still further strengthened her in her designs.
(7.) Andor Gomme argues that one of the novel's flaws consists in Anne's having taken Lady Russell's advice: "To say (as, a little complacently, Anne does) that she now has nothing to reproach herself with implies that all her duty then lay away from the man she loved and towards obeying a person for whose judgement and discretion the reader is by this time likely to have scant respect....