represent to (someone or something)

(redirected from represented themselves to)

represent to (someone or something)

1. To embody, typify, or act as an example of something to someone or something. The size of the project may look daunting, but it represents a huge business opportunity to me. That kind of behavior might represents a lazy, unreliable person to some people.
2. To indicate, symbolize, or stand for someone or something in the eyes of someone or something else. The subtle position of the woman's hand in the painting represents remorse to some people, while other think it represents acceptance. Though they may be politically incorrect, these festivities represent an important piece of cultural heritage to a lot of people in the country.
3. To act or serve as someone's or something's delegate, advocate, or agent while dealing with someone or something else. I decided to just let a recruiter represent me to potential employers who might have a position that fits my skills and experience. He went to the summit to represent his constituency to parliament.
4. To state, explain, or describe something to someone or something. My job it so argue the case in line with the way my client has represented the facts to me. They represented the project to the committee as an opportunity to revitalize the city's economy.
See also: represent

represent something to someone

 
1. to exemplify something to someone. What does this behavior represent to you? This represents a lapse in manners to me.
2. to explain a matter to someone. He represented the matter to me in a much more charitable light. I did not represent it properly to you.
See also: represent
References in classic literature ?
All those things represented themselves to my view, and that is the blackest and most frightful form: and as I was very free with my governess, whom I had now learned to call mother, I represented to her all the dark thoughts which I had upon me about it, and told her what distress I was in.
citizens and typically represented themselves to be American and in some cases British citizens, posting about politically charged topics such as race relations and opposition to President Donald Trump.
Hers has been an analysis of, to use the words of Medick, "words, images, institutions, behaviors in terms of which in each place people actually represented themselves to themselves and to one another" (p.