represent to (someone or something)

(redirected from represent ourselves to)

represent to (someone or something)

1. To embody, typify, or act as an example of something to someone or something. The size of the project may look daunting, but it represents a huge business opportunity to me. That kind of behavior might represents a lazy, unreliable person to some people.
2. To indicate, symbolize, or stand for someone or something in the eyes of someone or something else. The subtle position of the woman's hand in the painting represents remorse to some people, while other think it represents acceptance. Though they may be politically incorrect, these festivities represent an important piece of cultural heritage to a lot of people in the country.
3. To act or serve as someone's or something's delegate, advocate, or agent while dealing with someone or something else. I decided to just let a recruiter represent me to potential employers who might have a position that fits my skills and experience. He went to the summit to represent his constituency to parliament.
4. To state, explain, or describe something to someone or something. My job it so argue the case in line with the way my client has represented the facts to me. They represented the project to the committee as an opportunity to revitalize the city's economy.
See also: represent
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

represent something to someone

 
1. to exemplify something to someone. What does this behavior represent to you? This represents a lapse in manners to me.
2. to explain a matter to someone. He represented the matter to me in a much more charitable light. I did not represent it properly to you.
See also: represent
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
See also:
References in periodicals archive ?
It's about how we represent ourselves to the world.''
In contrast to those who suppose that self-knowledge is transmitted automatically through the presence of phenomenal properties, and in contrast to those who suppose that self-knowledge requires us to represent ourselves to ourselves, Soteriou shows how having a mental life that is governed by different aims ensures a kind of self-knowledge--a knowledge of what we are doing--that is not a matter of self-reflection but of self-direction.
And if we can represent ourselves to ourselves using cognitive resources other than language, what is to prevent other animals from doing so?
In addition to our knowledge of the industry, we can also represent ourselves to be competitive in our prices to European suppliers - especially now with the increasing value of the euro which is space-rocketing the price of equipment and raw materials.
People are in shock, but there is a determination now to represent ourselves to the world as people who value human life unlike those responsible for yesterday, who do not.