report to (someone or something)

(redirected from reports to)

report to (someone or something)

1. To present oneself to someone or appear at some location as instructed. I have to report to my parole officer every Friday afternoon. Please report to the center for immigration to renew your work permit.
2. To be under the authority or supervision of some person, office, group, or organization. With all due respect, I report to the president and no one else. Following the promotion, you will henceforth report to the company's global headquarters in Detroit.
3. To give a formal account of some information to some person, office, group, or organization. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "report" and "to." We are going to report our findings to the board of directors next week. Please report such complaints to the HR department.
4. To inform a person, office, or institution of authority of someone's bad or illegal behavior. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "report" and "to." I can't believe you reported me to the principal—I thought we were friends! The doctor reported his patient to the police.
See also: report

report something to someone

to present a body of information to someone. Please report the results to the supervisor. The event was reported to the proper person.
See also: report

report to someone or something

 
1. to present oneself to someone or an office. You must report to me for duty at noon. They told me to report to this office at this time.
2. to be supervised by someone or an office. When you start work here, you will report to Mrs. Franklin. I report directly to the home office.
3. to return to someone or an office and make a report. Please report to me when you have the results. If you have any more to say, please report to headquarters and tell the whole story.
See also: report
References in periodicals archive ?
Those leaders use those company reports to make decisions that send maintenance dollars to units based on their AMSS reports.
The revised standards, effective for reviews commencing on or after January 1, 2005, will enhance the quality of peer reviews and increase the usefulness of peer review reports to the public and regulators as well as to reviewed firms.
The FCRA definition of a consumer report is "a communication of any information by a consumer reporting agency." FCRA defines a consumer reporting agency as "any person which for monetary fees, dues or on cooperative nonprofit basis regularly engages in whole or in part in the practice of assembling or evaluating consumer credit information for the purpose of furnishing consumer reports to third parties."
To identify any unusual fluctuations in an agency's crime counts, the Program compares monthly reports to previous submissions of the agency and with those for similar agencies.
The prospects who received the combined mailing purchased enough special reports to yield over $20,000 in profits after total production costs of the catalog.
In addition to prohibited services, the new rules set forth provisions on audit partner rotation and reports to audit committees.
Infection control professionals faxed or e-mailed completed summary and case ascertainment reports to officials in appropriate local and state health departments; these reports were then forwarded to the CDC New Jersey Operations Center at NJDHSS for review.
Additionally, law enforcement agencies submit Quarterly Hate Crime Reports to report zero hate crime incidents; that is, no hate crime incidents occurred in their jurisdiction that quarter.
By clicking on the GAO Reports link on the home page, visitors can select from Today's Reports to keep up to date on the latest GAO studies, New Testimony to access reports that are up to five days old, or Recent Reports and Testimony for reports older than five days.
In the event of a misconduct complaint, the reviewing officials rely almost exclusively on reports to make an initial judgment regarding justification for the use of force.
Use annual reports to communicate with core investment constituencies
AT&T, which prints more than 4 million annual reports to reach one of the largest shareholder bases in the United States, groups its audiences into four segments: institutional investors, individual investors, key influencers (including investment analysts) and other interested parties, such as legislators, regulators, libraries and universities.
But regardless, its financial data is easy to decipher; Bruncor's is among just half a dozen reports to feature a grid that breaks out operations, naming competitors as well as customers for each.
Any organization that reports to or queries NPDB must certify in writing that it is authorized to request or receive information.