rend (something) to (something)

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rend (something) to (something)

To rip, tear, or split something apart into smaller pieces. ("Rend" conjugates to either "rent" or, less commonly, "rended" in the past tense and past participle.) He rent the contract to shreds when he realized that he'd be losing out on nearly 30% of the profits. I took the loaf of bread and rended it to pieces to share amongst the other starving children.
See also: rend
References in classic literature ?
If they paid rent, of course, they might pay forever, and be no better off; whereas, if they could only meet the extra expense in the beginning, there would at last come a time when they would not have any rent to pay for the rest of their lives.
It was hard to tell, with all this strange legal jargon, words he had never heard before; but was not this plain--"the party of the first part hereby covenants and agrees to rent to the said party of the second part!" And then again-- "a monthly rental of twelve dollars, for a period of eight years and four months!" Then Szedvilas took off his spectacles, and looked at the agent, and stammered a question.
Now, the tenants of Appin have to pay a rent to King George; but their hearts are staunch, they are true to their chief; and what with love and a bit of pressure, and maybe a threat or two, the poor folk scrape up a second rent for Ardshiel.
And anyhow there'll be no rent to pay and no novelettes to write."
and if such default shall not be cured within ten (10) days after notice of such default shall have been given" to them, then they would "pay such rent to Madison and any arrears thereof...." The Millers further agreed that their obligations under the guaranty would "in no wise be terminated, affected, diminished or impaired by reason of the assertion, or the failure to assert, by Landlord against Tenant of any of the rights and remedies reserved to Landlord pursuant to the provisions of the Lease."
31, 2001, but does not pay rent to its controlling shareholder until Jan.
In this ease, the cumulative rent paid as of the close of 12/31/2000 ($1.2 million) exceeds the cumulative rent allocated as of the close of the succeeding calendar year ($240,000), so the rental agreement includes prepaid rent.(34) If the same agreement provided for all the rent to be payable on 12/31/2009, the agreement would include deferred rent since the cumulative rent allocated as of 12/31/2000 ($120,000) exceeds the cumulative rent payable as of the close of the succeeding calendar year ($0).
The tenant recognizes income as a result of the reduced rent to be paid and improves cash flow by paying a lower or no rent at the start of the lease period.
In contrast, Downtown New York experienced a net rent decline of 15.4% during 2003, partially offset by rising non-rent occupancy expenses, thus limiting the drop in total rent to 7.8%.
If the rent has a greater prepayment or deferral, the regulations require interest to be imputed, but generally do not require rent to be leveled.
16,172, CAB allowed a first rent to be charged where the dwelling unit had been altered so extensively that it did not previously exist in its present form.
Similarly, if a lessor credits rent paid toward its assumed obligation to make leasehold improvements, the improvements will be considered a substitute for rent.(32) If, instead, a lessor were to increase the rent to compensate for leasehold improvements it made, the cost reimbursement will still be classified as rent(33) In Beecham Inc,(34) a district court held that payments by a lessee to a lessor to compensate for customizing space for the lessee was not rent because customization added little or nothing to the value of the real estate.
The prohibition has resulted in reducing building incomes because the owners either rent to tenants that can't pay market rents, rent to office users in the hopes no one notices, or conscientiously leave spaces empty because the available tenants don't meet the zoning requirements.
The leases did not contain any other provisions allocating rent to particular periods.
The court indicated that Colbert's desire to rent to low-income families at reduced rental rates established that he deliberately rented the property at an amount less than FMV.