render (something) in (something)

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render (something) in (something)

1. To represent, depict, or portray in some visual or verbal form. You input all your information into the app, and it renders your daily activity in an easy-to-understand graph. The author has the uncanny ability of rendering the most intimate, intangible experiences in stark and haunting prose.
2. To translate or express something in a different language. It's very difficult to render this in English, as it will inevitably lack some of the nuance found in the original German text. My job is to render the product's user manual in Japanese. The word is rendered in English as "dread."
3. To display converted digital information as a visual image or video using a particular software or program or within some place therein. A noun or pronoun can be used between "render" and "down." The program renders your picture in a preview box at the top of the screen so you have an idea of how your work will look. You'll have to render the raw files in a graphics processor and then save it as an MPEG or MP4.
4. To convert digital information on a computer into a particular media format. A noun or pronoun can be used between "render" and "down." I'm trying to render the various audio tracks in an MP3 file. I need to export the data and render it in a PDF.
See also: render

render something in(to) something

to translate something into something. Now, see if you can render this passage in French. Are you able to render this into German?
See also: render
References in periodicals archive ?
Huntington Beach, CA, July 22, 2010 --(PR.com)-- Axceleon[TM] brings the power of the cloud to Siggraph and Hollywood in demonstrating CloudFuzion, which enables the management and control of image process and rendering in internal and external cloud infrastructures.
Functioning as an empty distraction from the new urban boredom, as Clement Greenberg contends, kitsch effectively conveys Middlebrook's message: To make a sweet, schematic watercolor painting of a pair of swans necking or a pert chickadee perched on a twig is to forgo the natural subject altogether, rendering in its place a cipher for nature held at such a distance that the relationship collapses into romantic, synthetic formula.