render (something) into (something)

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render (something) into (something)

1. To represent, depict, or portray in some visual or verbal form. You input all your information into the app, and it renders your daily activity into an easy-to-understand graph. The author has the uncanny ability of rendering the most intimate, intangible experiences into stark and haunting prose.
2. To translate or express something in a different language. It's very difficult to render this into English, as it will inevitably lack some of the nuance found in the original German text. My job is to render the product's user manual into Japanese. The word is rendered into English as "dread."
3. To convert digital information on a computer into a particular media format. A noun or pronoun can be used between "render" and "down." I'm trying to render the various audio tracks into an MP3 file. I need to export the data and render it into a PDF.
See also: render
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
The word is strongly expressive in their language, but not easily rendered into English; it signifies, "to retire to his first mother." Her excuse for not coming sooner, was, that her husband dying late in the morning, she was a good while consulting her servants about a convenient place where his body should be laid; and I observed, she behaved herself at our house as cheerfully as the rest.
In sum, the essays reveal humans rendered into animals and animals rendered into humans; nature rendered as innocent, invisible, and elemental; environments rendered through race and race rendered through environment; nature rendered through time, text, and archive, while also making visible the politics of rendering nature as patriotic, as product, and as a form of protest.
When those cows were slaughtered, some of their body parts were rendered into animal feed, which infected more cows.
In Great Britain, BSE spread among cow herds when diseased animals were rendered into cow feed.
Acknowledging the obvious indebtedness to Luther in these volumes, Daniell argues that Tyndale's translation is by no means merely Luther rendered into English.