remonstrate

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remonstrate about (someone or something) (with one)

To plead or argue (with one) in protest, objection, or complaint about someone or something. I spent the entire day remonstrating with the manager of our hotel about the terrible quality of our stay. Instead of spending so much time remonstrating with her, you should take a moment to explain how she could do the work properly in the future.
See also: remonstrate

remonstrate with (one) (about someone or something)

To plead or argue with one in protest, objection, or complaint (about someone or something). I spent the entire day remonstrating with the manager of our hotel about the terrible quality of our stay. Instead of spending so much time remonstrating with her, you should take a moment to explain how she could do the work properly in the future. I'm done remonstrating with you about John. It's clear you're not going to do anything about him.
See also: remonstrate, someone
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

remonstrate (with someone) (about someone or something)

to protest to someone about someone or something. After remonstrating with the manager about the price for a while, Vernon left quietly. I spent an hour remonstrating about Ted with Alice.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
If he is loud, or peremptory, or remonstrative, he is treated in return with insolence or contempt.
Wolfe's irony is Fielding's irony, the gently remonstrative, witty send-up of the pompous.
Delegates in particular appear to function in a remonstrative capacity on behalf of their constituents (O'Brien 1994b).
At the same time, no serious study of Philo can disregard the fact that his preferred medium was homiletic hermeneutics; the literary form of most of his writings was biblical exegesis, whether symbolic, allegorical, or literal, and he used this form to relay hortatory, expository, remonstrative, and didactic messages.
Perhaps the most extreme example of the period's countless pamphlets calling for abolishing theatre (which was achieved with the closing of the playhouses in 1642) was William Prynne's Histriomastix (1633), a venomous and voluminous diatribe whose repetitious and remonstrative rhetoric prefigures that of Jesse Helms so precisely, it's tempting to think that the North Carolina senator has studied it.
From 30 paces away, I could see that we were in for a couple of yards of remonstrative gab.