remember


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

be remembered as (something)

To have one's particular role as something be the primary part of one's legacy. That choreographer will be remembered as a true innovator in the world of dance.
See also: remember

be remembered for (something)

To have one's particular action, such as an accomplishment or misdeed, be the primary part of one's legacy. That choreographer will be remembered for all of her innovations in the world of dance.
See also: remember

something to remember (one) by

A memento or keepsake to remind one of someone. I'll miss you too. Here, keep my hat—something to remember me by.
See also: by, remember, something

remember (one) to (someone)

To bring or deliver one's greetings to someone else. Have fun on your trip—please remember me to Aunt Lily and Uncle Michael!
See also: remember

can't remember a fucking thing

rude slang Has difficulty remembering anything; forgets a lot of things. Geez, I can't remember a fucking thing these days! I'm so sorry I forgot your birthday!
See also: fucking, remember, thing

can't remember shit

rude slang Has difficulty remembering anything; forgets a lot of things. Geez, I can't remember shit these days! I'm so sorry I forgot your birthday!
See also: remember, shit

remember (someone or something) as (something)

To have a memory of someone or something as being a particular way or a particular type of person or thing. I remember my childhood as a very happy experience, so I was shocked to find out that my brother remembers it differently. I remember him as a being real jerk, but everyone looks back on him very fondly. You'll remember your college years as the best time of your life, so make the most of them.
See also: remember

remember (someone) in (one's) will

To include someone in one's final will and testament in order to bequeath something to them after one's death. My grandfather and I were very close, so I was so surprised when he didn't remember me in his will. You've done so much for me and my wife—we'll be sure to remember you in our wills.
See also: remember, will

remember to write

A clichéd farewell urging someone to remain in contact while they are gone. Sometimes used humorously as a casual farewell. Have a wonderful time in Paris, Colin! Remember to write! A: "I'd better get going, thanks for having me!" B: "No problem. Remember to write!"
See also: remember, write

Remember me to someone.

Please carry my good wishes to someone. (The someone can be a person's name or a pronoun.) Tom: My brother says hello. Bill: Oh, good. Please remember me to him. Tom: I will. Fred: Bye. John: Good-bye, Fred. Remember me to your Uncle Tom.
See also: remember

remember someone as something

to recall someone as being a particular type of person. I remember Terri as a rather cheerful girl, always willing to help out. William will be remembered as a grouchy person.
See also: remember

remember someone in one's will

to bequeath something to someone in one's will. My uncle always said he would remember me in his will. He failed to remember me in his will.
See also: remember, will

remember someone to someone

to carry the greetings of someone to someone else. Please remember all of us to your uncle. I will remember you to my brother, who asks of you often.
See also: remember

Remember to write,

 and Don't forget to write. 
1. Lit. a final parting comment made to remind someone going on a journey to write to those remaining at home. Alice: Bye. Mary: Good-bye, Alice. Remember to write. Alice: I will. Bye. Sally: Remember to write! Fred: I will!
2. Fig. a parting comment made to someone in place of a regular good-bye. (Jocular.) John: See you tomorrow. Bye. Jane: See you. Remember to write. John: Okay. See you after lunch. Jane: Yeah. Bye. Remember to write.
See also: remember, write

something to reˈmember somebody by

(informal) a punishment, especially a physical one: If I ever catch you stealing my apples again, I’ll give you something to remember me by.

be reˈmembered as/for something

be famous or known for a particular thing that you have done in the past: He is best remembered as the man who brought jazz to Britain.A natural journalist, he will be remembered for his words rather than his actions.
See also: remember, something

remember to

v.
To deliver greetings from someone to someone else: Please remember me to your family.
See also: remember

can’t remember a fucking thing

and CRAFT
phr. & comp. abb. a phrase said when one’s memory fails. (Usually objectionable.) Gee, I’m getting old. CRAFT. What’s your name, again? I can’t remember a fucking thing!
See also: fucking, remember, thing

can’t remember shit

and CRS
phr. & comp. abb. can’t remember anything. (Usually objectionable.) Tom can’t remember shit. He has to write everything down. I was diagnosed with CRS. It comes with age!
See also: remember, shit
References in classic literature ?
It is not logically necessary to the existence of a memory-belief that the event remembered should have occurred, or even that the past should have existed at all.
That is to say if we suppose that A is the event remembered, B the remembering, and t the interval of time between A and B, there must be some characteristic of B which is capable of degrees, and which, in accurately dated memories, varies as t varies.
In actual fact, there are doubtless various factors that concur in giving us the feeling of greater or less remoteness in some remembered event.
I gave her a spray of lilac, I remember, and you gave her a franc.
On Sunday afternoon Alexander remembered Miss Burgoyne's invitation and called at her apartment.
Yet, Faustus, look up to heaven, and remember mercy is infinite.
Though my heart pant and quiver to remember that I have been a student here these thirty years, O, would I had never seen Wittenberg, never read book!
I remember a few nights in my lifetime, and in a big ship, too (as big as they made them then), when one did not get flung out of one's bed simply because one never even attempted to get in; one had been made too weary, too hopeless, to try.
And this is one of those gales whose memory in after-years returns, welcome in dignified austerity, as you would remember with pleasure the noble features of a stranger with whom you crossed swords once in knightly encounter and are never to see again.
"I do remember it," cried Emma; "I perfectly remember it.
Elton was sitting here, I remember, much about where I am now."
I remember, as my sobs died down, that I became interested in watching the strange light-effects produced by partially opening and closing my tear-wet eyelids.
I remember that several times I came to open spaces.
Levin remembered that when Nikolay had been in the devout stage, the period of fasts and monks and church services, when he was seeking in religion a support and a curb for his passionate temperament, everyone, far from encouraging him, had jeered at him, and he, too, with the others.
The worst and most tiresome part of his character, what made all relations with him so difficult, had been forgotten by Konstantin Levin when he thought of him, and now, when he saw his face, and especially that nervous twitching of his head, he remembered it all.