remain at (something or some place)

(redirected from remains at)

remain at (something or some place)

1. To continue to be physically present at or in some place or thing; to stay (behind) at some place or thing. I wish you wouldn't remain at the office for such long hours. One of my men will remain at the station to make sure Robert arrives safely.
2. To continue to work for some company. A lot of my colleagues transferred to different companies, but I remained at FlemCo for nearly 30 years out of some misplaced sense of loyalty. He announced that he will remain at the company despite the recent allegations against him.
See also: remain
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
After the final analysis and examination of remains at 12 locations in BiH, representatives of the International Commission on Missing Persons (ICMP) presented the results of the examination of those remains that are relevant to the work of prosecutors in the processing of war crimes cases.
Or: INAH could have kept the remains at the institute without alerting the Consulate General.
It said strong protests have been to Japan's Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare which is responsible for the retrieval of remains of the war dead, about the possible burial of non-Japanese remains at a Japanese national cemetery.
The nationwide occupancy rate for the independent-living sector remains at 91 percent, but rises to 95.1 percent in the 30 largest MSAs.
Smith, Hawaii, set out in 12-foot-high elephant grass to look for remains at the spot believed to be the crash site, and joint recovery operations began in January 2003.
The Army's Central Identification Laboratory in Hawaii was attempting to identify the remains at press time.
While the organization of its material remains at times less than user-friendly, Rescripting Shakespeare constitutes a valuable resource for theater practitioners and may aid scholars pursuing theoretical work in performance studies.
Although consumer confidence has fallen, at least for now it remains at a level that in the past was consistent with economic growth.
Ongoing excavation of trash pits and building remains at El Paraiso began in 1983.
Bones of ancient cattle, giraffes and mastodons found in the same sediment as the skull resemble animal remains at nearby sites dated at 9 million to 10 million years old.
Vultures feast on the prime flesh remains at these sites, he reports, but hyenas "apparently don't frequent rivers very regularly." Large marrow bones can often be found at lion kills for two days or more.