remain at (something or some place)

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remain at (something or some place)

1. To continue to be physically present at or in some place or thing; to stay (behind) at some place or thing. I wish you wouldn't remain at the office for such long hours. One of my men will remain at the station to make sure Robert arrives safely.
2. To continue to work for some company. A lot of my colleagues transferred to different companies, but I remained at FlemCo for nearly 30 years out of some misplaced sense of loyalty. He announced that he will remain at the company despite the recent allegations against him.
See also: remain
References in classic literature ?
In fact, the ambassador, as he himself has declared, was never authorized to make that demand, and as soon as I was informed of it I let him know how much I disapproved of it and ordered him to remain at his post.
Gentlemen, let the most profound silence cover all this with an impenetrable veil; we will detain this gentleman, not from mistrust of him with regard to the crime, but to assure more effectively the secret of the general's absence by keeping among ourselves; therefore, until fresh orders, the gentleman will remain at headquarters."
He instructed Passepartout to remain at the hotel until his return, that Aouda might not be left entirely alone.
Thus, in Example 6 above, if S2 could establish that the $5 loss arose from the sale of recently acquired asset C, the suspended loss would still remain at $6.
While certain procedures for fingerprinting, entering wanted records, and checking wanted status remain at the core of law enforcement information management, officers must remember the importance of the information each user provides and the impact it can have on other individuals or activities.
Under the sale terms, IBM will remain at the site's office building until March 1999.
Homebuilding was projected to remain at a pace that was relatively robust compared with the rate of recent years, though a bit below that of the fourth quarter.
It is my firm belief that, with fiscal consolidation and with the monetary policy path that we have charted, the United States is well positioned to remain at the forefront of the world economy well into the next century.
This year has been an especially favorable period for many banks, and the industry's improved profitability has helped some institutions remain at least temporarily solvent beyond the period in which they had been expected to fail.