get religion

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get religion

1. To begin to follow or adhere to a particular religion. My fiancé is Catholic, so I guess it's about time I got religion myself.
2. To decide to act in a more virtuous manner. Nothing like a near-death experience to help you get religion, huh?
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get religion

Fig. to become serious (about something), usually after a powerful experience. (Sometimes literal.) When I had an automobile accident, I really got religion. Now I'm a very safe driver.
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get religion

Be converted; also, decide to behave in an upright, ethical way. For example, After the children were born, John got religion and joined the church, or After years of total selfishness, she suddenly got religion and is doing all kinds of volunteer work . [Second half of 1700s]
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get religion

be converted to religious belief and practices. informal
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get reˈligion

(informal, often disapproving) suddenly become interested in religion: He got religion while he was touring in Australia.
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get religion

Informal
1. To become religious or devout.
2. To resolve to end one's immoral behavior.
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References in periodicals archive ?
After all, while some see religion and film as a sub-discipline separate from the main media and religion one, for college students a media and religion course may well be the student's sole exposure also to the subject of Film and Religion.
Not all science fiction has religious undertones, but there can be similarities between science fiction and religion.
Freedom From Religion Foundation, but the justices won't be deliberating the constitutionality of the faith-based initiative.
PRINCETON, NJ -- Americans are divided in their opinions about the current level of influence displayed by organized religion in America today.
That will never do: since religion makes claims about reality, Dawkins insists that it be held to some sort of scientific standards; and judging by them he concludes that all theology fails: "There is almost certainly no God.
conservative Protestants are more likely to donate and volunteer than people not affiliated with a religion, or those who identify themselves with other religions;
The rise of religion in politics was the biggest story of the last 30 years, and political scientists just missed it,'' said Alan Wolfe, director of the Boisi Center for Religion and American Public Life at Boston College.
There have been other, more plausible attempts to explain religion as a biological adaptation.
Over the past decade, psychologists' interest in understanding the role that spirituality and religion play in healthy human functioning has increased greatly.
Since there is no broadly accepted definition of religion, Taylor and his colleagues had to choose one of various possibilities; what they settled on is based on David Chidester's vague definition, who argued in his 1996 Savage Systems: Colonialism and Comparative Religion in Southern Africa that the term "religion has been a contested category[;] a single, incontestable definition of religion cannot simply be established by academic flat" (ix), and who consciously proposed a vague definition: religion is "that dimension of human experience engaged with sacred norms" (ix).
The religion sections in secular bookstores are a digest of the world's religions, and in some places it may be hard to find a Christian text in the mix.
The Framework encourages pupils to 'learn from different religions, beliefs, values and traditions, while exploring their own beliefs and questions of meaning, and develop respect for and sensitivity to others, in particular those whose faith and beliefs are different from their own '.
Deftly compiled and edited by Zainal Abidin Bagir (Center for Religious and Cross-cultural Studies, Gadjah Mada University, Indonesia), Science And Religion In A Post-Colonial Word: Interfaith Perspectives is an in-depth study of conceptual findings and theories of modern science and the questioning required by the various theologies of diverse religions.
The result was "An Open Letter Concerning Religion and Science," which has received endorsements from 10,000 clergy members around the country.
By this point, Jefferson had written his draft of the Virginia statute of religious freedom, and he and James Madison were known as the strictest proponents of keeping government and religion far apart.