relegate (someone or something) to (something)

(redirected from relegated us to)

relegate (someone or something) to (something)

To consign someone or something to some inferior, obscure, or trivial rank, status, position, place, category, etc. Often used in passive constructions. So brief was his presidency that William Henry Harrison has been relegated to little more than a footnote in American history. Rather than firing me outright, they've relegated me to a thankless, dead-end job in the company. Failing to find critical success in the art work, his work has been relegated to the lobbies of cheap hotels and cafés.
See also: relegate
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

relegate someone to someone or something

to assign someone to someone or something. (Often refers to something unimportant or demeaning.) They relegated the old man to a bed in the corner. The former vice president was relegated to the position of manager of special projects.
See also: relegate
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The Speech from the Throne was missing the nation-to-nation and rights language and relegated us to interest groups.
The latest Pisa league tables, based on 68 nations, show that Welsh Labour has relegated us to 43rd in maths, 41st in reading and 36th in science.
As one pensioner put it: "They relegated us to the shadows, they didn't think we had a voice but we've proved them wrong today."
Despite official efforts to rein it in, the church has had a 2,000-year history of "cafeteria Catholicism," and progressive Catholics need to claim the middle from the right-wing Catholic groups that have relegated us to the margins.
Through this story, Achenbach believes, we have found a way to reclaim our centrality to the universe; we can deny the scientific view that has relegated us to insignificant organisms living on a speck of dust in the backwaters of the cosmos.
And that horror was reflected in several of the Jesuit teachers who refused to allow us to speak in class, even to ask a question, who relegated us to the back of the classroom where they could ignore us.