reinvent

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reinvent (oneself)

To create a new style or persona for oneself; to change one's pursuits, way of life, etc. As a teenager, I was always trying to reinvent myself to be cooler or more mysterious. If you're feeling stuck in a rut with your job, maybe it's time to reinvent yourself.
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reinvent the wheel

To do something in a wholly and drastically new way, often unnecessarily. (Usually used in negative constructions.) The film doesn't reinvent the wheel for action films, but it adds enough clever twists on the genre to still feel fresh and new. The company is often criticized for trying to reinvent the wheel every time they bring a new product to market, adding gimmicks and innovations nobody wanted or asked for.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel

Fig. to make unnecessary or redundant preparations. You don't need to reinvent the wheel. Read up on what others have done. I don't have to reinvent the wheel, but I will be cautious before I act.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel

Do something again, from the beginning, especially in a needless or inefficient effort, as in School committees need not reinvent the wheel every time they try to improve the curriculum. This expression alludes to the invention of a simple but very important device that requires no improvement. [Second half of 1900s]
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel

If someone reinvents the wheel, they develop an idea or project that they consider new or different, when it is really no better than something that already exists. To avoid reinventing the wheel, it is important that managers are familiar with established research findings in this area. The problem is that they tend to reinvent the wheel each time they are called upon to respond to a new refugee emergency.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel

waste a great deal of time or effort in creating something that already exists or doing something that has already been done.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the ˈwheel

waste time creating something that already exists and works well: There’s no point in us reinventing the wheel. Why can’t we just leave things as they are?
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel

tv. to make unnecessary or redundant preparations. You don’t need to reinvent the wheel. Read up on what others have done.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent (oneself)

To take up a different career or a different way of life.

reinvent the wheel

To do or make something again, from the beginning, especially in a needless or inefficient effort.
See also: reinvent, wheel

reinvent the wheel, to

To belabor the obvious; to start again from the beginning when there is no need to. This Americanism dates from the second half of the twentieth century and most likely originated in business or industry. “‘The new compiler here is no different from the old one,’ said a Defense Department spokesman. ‘Let’s not reinvent the wheel’” (Boston Herald, 1984).
See also: reinvent
References in periodicals archive ?
The use of the customer metaphor in the reinventing government perspective borrows heavily from utilitarian logic, the public choice model, and the modern application of market economics to government.
The participants responded by reinventing a vast array of societal institutions.
Both remembering and reinventing the future, Buzari sets up a strange experience of temporality.
Reinventing the CFO has lots of good things going for it, not the least of which is an effusive set of cover blurbs from CFOS themselves talking about "redefining the role of finance," "a wake-up call for CFOs and their colleagues" and "essential reading for individuals taking on the senior finance role."
The change of rhetorical clothing may be useful as a heuristic device, but it is important at some point to be clear that we are not really reinventing liberty, but rather recovering its ancient basis through new forms of organization made possible by the blessings of technology.
The authors conclude that reinventing juvenile justice is the equivalent of reinvesting in our youth and is the obligation of society as a whole.
An ideology gaining popularity among policymakers - and articulated in Reinventing Government, by David Osborne and Ted Gaebler - holds that local governments need to be remade.
These "super humans" use IBM Watson to perform their profession at levels well beyond today's benchmarks; in doing so they are reinventing themselves, their professions and the organizations they work for.
Armstrong on Reinventing Performance Management: Building a Culture of Continuous Improvement
The first step in reinventing yourself is to admit the reality of change.
"I'm sure Sunny Delight are impressed with themselves for reinventing the drink but we're not seeing any great difference in its ingredients."
(3) But one doesn't have to follow the details of Ranciere's analysis to grasp the problem of "reinventing aesthetics" or discovering anew links between thinking and "the sensible."
Today's biggest challenge, he says, is constantly reinventing businesses in the face of technology, and doing so at the rate of technological change.
REINVENTING DEMOCRATS The Politics of Liberalism from Reagan to Clinton
These factors militate for three interrelated reforms that should be made while reinventing the communication function if it's to serve as a strategic partner in the future organization.