reflection


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Related to reflection: Reflection of light

reflect (back) (up)on someone or something

to remember or think about someone or something. (Upon is formal and less commonly used than on.) When I reflect back on the years I spent with my parents, I think I had a good childhood. I like to reflect on my great-grandmother.
See also: on, reflect

reflect on

1. Consider or think carefully about, as in She reflected on her country's role in history. [c. 1600] A closely related phrase is on due reflection, meaning "after careful consideration." For example, On due reflection I decided to vote for the incumbent.
2. reflect on one. Give evidence of one's qualities, as in The hasty preparation of this report will reflect on you. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: on, reflect

on mature reˈflection/consideˈration

(formal) after thinking about something carefully and for a long time: He wanted to ban his staff from using the Internet at work, but on mature reflection he decided that this would not be good for morale.

a sad, poor, etc. reflection on something

a thing which damages somebody’s/something’s reputation: The increase in crime is a sad reflection on our society today.
See also: on, reflection, something

reflect on

or reflect upon
v.
1. To think carefully about something: He sat in the garden and reflected on what he had just read.
2. To express carefully considered thoughts about something: In the essay, she reflects on her long career and offers advice for young writers.
3. To give evidence of the characteristics or qualities of someone or something: The student's performance reflects well on the whole school. Hasty preparation of the report will reflect badly on you.
4. To appear as a reflected image on some surface: The trees are reflecting on the water.
5. To cause something to appear as a reflected image on some surface: The window reflected wavy lines on the floor.
See also: on, reflect
References in classic literature ?
The dull precious metal seemed to flash with a reflection of her bright and ardent spirit.
Another reflection was of great use to me, and doubtless would be so to any one that should fall into such distress as mine was; and this was, to compare my present condition with what I at first expected it would be; nay, with what it would certainly have been, if the good providence of God had not wonderfully ordered the ship to be cast up nearer to the shore, where I not only could come at her, but could bring what I got out of her to the shore, for my relief and comfort; without which, I had wanted for tools to work, weapons for defence, and gunpowder and shot for getting my food.
These reflections made me very sensible of the goodness of Providence to me, and very thankful for my present condition, with all its hardships and misfortunes; and this part also I cannot but recommend to the reflection of those who are apt, in their misery, to say, "Is any affliction like mine?
I had another reflection, which assisted me also to comfort my mind with hopes; and this was comparing my present situation with what I had deserved, and had therefore reason to expect from the hand of Providence.
He dismissed the subject from his mind, however, with the consolatory reflection that time alone would show; and this is the reflection we would impress upon the reader.
Weller bestowed a look of deep, unspeakable admiration on his son, and, having once more grasped his hand, walked slowly away, revolving in his mind the numerous reflections to which his advice had given rise.
As these games were very silently conducted, notwithstanding the magnitude of the interests involved, Mr Swiveller began to think that on those evenings when Mr and Miss Brass were out (and they often went out now) he heard a kind of snorting or hard-breathing sound in the direction of the door, which it occurred to him, after some reflection, must proceed from the small servant, who always had a cold from damp living.
A thousand one such reflections whirled in succession through his brain; and, resting his head between his hands, he sat there for hours without raising it.
And do you not know also that although they make use of the visible forms and reason about them, they are thinking not of these, but of the ideals which they resemble; not of the figures which they draw, but of the absolute square and the absolute diameter, and so on-- the forms which they draw or make, and which have shadows and reflections in water of their own, are converted by them into images, but they are really seeking to behold the things themselves, which can only be seen with the eye of the mind?
And of this kind I spoke as the intelligible, although in the search after it the soul is compelled to use hypotheses; not ascending to a first principle, because she is unable to rise above the region of hypothesis, but employing the objects of which the shadows below are resemblances in their turn as images, they having in relation to the shadows and reflections of them a greater distinctness, and therefore a higher value.
Such were my reflections as I commenced my journey; but as I proceeded, my spirits and hopes rose.
I had sufficient leisure for these and many other reflections during my journey to Ingolstadt, which was long and fatiguing.
Such were my reflections during the first two or three days of my residence at Ingolstadt, which were chiefly spent in becoming acquainted with the localities and the principal residents in my new abode.
But these were thoughts of no weight, and whenever he came to me they vanished; for his company was so delightful, that there was no being melancholy when he was there; the reflections were all the subject of those hours when I was alone.
My lover had been at the gates of death, and at the very brink of eternity; and, it seems, had been struck with a due remorse, and with sad reflections upon his past life of gallantry and levity; and among the rest, criminal correspondence with me, which was neither more nor less than a long-continued life of adultery, and represented itself as it really was, not as it had been formerly thought by him to be, and he looked upon it now with a just and religious abhorrence.