refer back to (someone or something)

(redirected from refers us back to)

refer back to (someone or something)

1. To consult some previous piece or source of information; to turn one's attention back to something. We all referred back to the footage of our last game to see where each player could make improvements. I'll have to refer back to my notes to see what we had decided on at the last meeting.
2. To relate or pertain to something previously mentioned or seen. The image of the flowers refers back to the scene at the beginning of the film. The senator was referring back to the speech she gave in May.
3. To submit something back to some person or group of authority, as to decide, settle, or examine something. We'll have to refer this matter back to our legal team before we can proceed any further. We've made the changes requested of us, so now we have to refer it back to the panel to see if it can be approved.
4. To direct someone to meet, speak, or consult with some person or group of authority, information, or aid for a second time. The specialist referred me back to the doctor who made the original diagnosis. They referred me back to their PR team when I asked them about rumors of a potential merger.
See also: back, refer
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

refer someone back to someone or something

to suggest that someone go back to someone or something, such as the source. I referred the client back to the lawyer she had originally consulted. Tom referred the customer back to the manufacturer who had made the shoddy product.
See also: back, refer

refer something back to someone or something

 and refer something back
to send something back to someone or a group for action. Dr. Smith knows more about this kind of case, so I referred it back to him. They referred back all the bills.
See also: back, refer
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
This refers us back to what Sun Tzu said in The Art of War: "In general, the method for employing the military is this: Preserving the enemy's state capital is best, destroying their state capital second-best.
The press release for David Salle's recent exhibition of his new "Vortex Paintings" is conspicuous in its magniloquence, claiming that the spiral at the center of these ten large oil-on-linen works creates an "unprecedented sense of spatial depth." It's temping to attribute this hyperbole to Mary Boone and Jeffrey Deitch, the show's copresenters, but the work's overtly formal emphasis ultimately refers us back to the artist himself as its source.
This refers us back to the historical European impression that Americans tend to keep a cheerful disposition--whether by doing constant emotion work or as their "second nature," formed on the basis of social circumstances and cultural habit.
Taking out the poubelle should be interpreted as a rite of purification, the abandoning of the detritus of myself, and it doesn't matter whether we're talking about the very ditritus contained in the poubelle or whether that detritus refers us back to every other possible detritus of mine; what matters is that through this daily gesture I confirm the need to separate myself from a part of what was once mine, the slough or chrysalis or squeezed lemon of living, or that its substance might remain, so that tomorrow I can identify completely (without residues) with what I am and have.