refer

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Related to refers: for the most part, set out, up to par

refer to (someone or something) as (someone or something)

To call someone or something by a particular name or title. Should I refer to you as Dr. Smith or Professor Smith? I think you're all old enough now that you can start calling me Nancy, instead of Mrs. Johnson. They guys in engineering have started referring to the project as "The Impossible Task."
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refer to (someone or something)

1. To mention or make a reference to someone or something. "What a loudmouth," said John, referring to Tom. I was referring to Paris, Texas, not Paris, France.
2. To indicate, signify, or point to someone or something. The first pie chart refers to the company's various expenditures, while the second refers to our sources of revenue. This line in the application refers to people with a weekly income of less than $500.
3. To look or turn to something as a source of information or support. Please refer to your employee handbook if you have any questions about these policies.
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refer (one) to (someone or something)

To send or direct one to someone or something as a source of information or support. You can refer the customer to clause 34-B if they are still unsure of their obligation. Let me refer you to a friend of mine. He's a clinical psychologist and may be able to help.
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refer back to (someone or something)

1. To consult some previous piece or source of information; to turn one's attention back to something. We all referred back to the footage of our last game to see where each player could make improvements. I'll have to refer back to my notes to see what we had decided on at the last meeting.
2. To relate or pertain to something previously mentioned or seen. The image of the flowers refers back to the scene at the beginning of the film. The senator was referring back to the speech she gave in May.
3. To submit something back to some person or group of authority, as to decide, settle, or examine something. We'll have to refer this matter back to our legal team before we can proceed any further. We've made the changes requested of us, so now we have to refer it back to the panel to see if it can be approved.
4. To direct someone to meet, speak, or consult with some person or group of authority, information, or aid for a second time. The specialist referred me back to the doctor who made the original diagnosis. They referred me back to their PR team when I asked them about rumors of a potential merger.
See also: back, refer

refer someone back to someone or something

to suggest that someone go back to someone or something, such as the source. I referred the client back to the lawyer she had originally consulted. Tom referred the customer back to the manufacturer who had made the shoddy product.
See also: back, refer

refer someone to someone or something

to direct someone to someone or something; to send someone to someone or something. The front office referred me to you, and you are now referring me to someone else! They should have referred you to the personnel department.
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refer something back to someone or something

 and refer something back
to send something back to someone or a group for action. Dr. Smith knows more about this kind of case, so I referred it back to him. They referred back all the bills.
See also: back, refer

refer to someone or something

to mention someone or something. Are you referring tome when you speak about a kind and helpful person? I was referring to the personnel department.
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refer to

v.
1. To mention or reference someone or something: When you say he's clumsy, are you referring to what he did the other day? When we are in the meeting, refer to me as your colleague and not as your sister.
2. To signify something or someone directly; denote something or someone: The red line on the graph refers to the birth rate and the blue line to the death rate.
3. To pertain to something or someone; concern something or someone: I have a question referring to yesterday's lecture.
4. To direct someone to someone or something for help, support, or information: My doctor couldn't find the problem, so she referred me to a specialist.
5. To have recourse to someone or something for help, support, or information; turn to someone or something: Whenever I encounter a word that I don't know, I refer to a dictionary.
6. To direct the attention of someone to something: The instructor referred us to the third page of the manual.
See also: refer
References in periodicals archive ?
- Lot 5 refers to 1 site with total length of 1715 m located in DHR Zemliane ;
'And forgive us our debts, as we forgive our debtors'-This refers to the solar plexus, the seat of the balancing forces in man as indicated in the phrase 'forgiveness of sins.' It refers to universal justice, karma.
Running refers to drinking wine, stating the necessity, presenting the required.
As an example, he refers to a list from the Sibylline Oracles (2:70-77, a third- or fourth-century Jewish and then Christian source--see http://www.sacred-texts.com/cla/sib/sib04.htm).
In another limitation of the language, Piraha kinship terms refer only to known, living relatives.
Six geese a-laying refers to the six days of creation
Due on sale refers to a provision in a mortgage that states that the entire balance of the note is immediately due and payable if the mortgagor transfers the property.
* Autonomy refers to a person with a disposition to function autonomously and in a self-directed manner on one's job, to make work decisions, and to choose a course of action without reliance on others.
Lincoln refers to the American Revolutionary War, a conflict that created a nation that the current war was threatening to tear apart.
who are worried about infertility patients permanently leaving their practice should refer them to a reproductive endocrinologist earlier rather than later to help ensure that they come back, results of a new study suggest.
In order to come to terms with the large number of names used to refer to students' ideas the following theoretical assumptions are made.
Erasmus further refers to semantic ambiguity or double entendre as a feature of some proverbs.
"Reconstructed" refers to a guess as to a word's meaning.
Direct discrimination refers to discriminatory practices against individuals who are known or presumed to be lesbian, gay, or bisexual.