refer back to

refer back to (someone or something)

1. To consult some previous piece or source of information; to turn one's attention back to something. We all referred back to the footage of our last game to see where each player could make improvements. I'll have to refer back to my notes to see what we had decided on at the last meeting.
2. To relate or pertain to something previously mentioned or seen. The image of the flowers refers back to the scene at the beginning of the film. The senator was referring back to the speech she gave in May.
3. To submit something back to some person or group of authority, as to decide, settle, or examine something. We'll have to refer this matter back to our legal team before we can proceed any further. We've made the changes requested of us, so now we have to refer it back to the panel to see if it can be approved.
4. To direct someone to meet, speak, or consult with some person or group of authority, information, or aid for a second time. The specialist referred me back to the doctor who made the original diagnosis. They referred me back to their PR team when I asked them about rumors of a potential merger.
See also: back, refer

refer someone back to someone or something

to suggest that someone go back to someone or something, such as the source. I referred the client back to the lawyer she had originally consulted. Tom referred the customer back to the manufacturer who had made the shoddy product.
See also: back, refer

refer something back to someone or something

 and refer something back
to send something back to someone or a group for action. Dr. Smith knows more about this kind of case, so I referred it back to him. They referred back all the bills.
See also: back, refer
References in classic literature ?
Mr Sampson perceiving his frail bark to be labouring among shoals and breakers, thought it safest not to refer back to any particular thing that he had been told, lest he should refer back to the wrong thing.
They establish the core interest level of your prospect, and if the answer is positive, then you can refer back to this buy in throughout your presentation.
Many of those [current family] rules just refer back to the civil rules has historically been difficult for our practice area is civil rules would make a change and we're not always aware of it happening in advance or in enough time for us to react.
Because when you look back at your career these are the games you will refer back to and that's the message to the players, not to waste this opportunity.
As operators go up and down aisles to pick assigned cases, they no longer have to refer back to an overhead monitor to register the item that was picked and placed on the conveyor.
Therefore, rather than criticising me for being petty, I would have thought that he would have welcomed the opportunity to refer back to the primary source of my argument.
The basics of economic development refer back to the mining of local capacity.
If you have never cooked rice before, first refer back to the May/June 2001 issue of Vegetarian Journal, available online at <www.
For more about Danticat, you might want to refer back to David Barsamian's fascinating interview with her in our October 2003 issue, which is available on our website, www.
Instead, objects bring an unexpected aggressiveness into the overall picture--again, though, as components that refer back to nothing concrete.
To refer back to the example of the fast against communalism, people who fasted that day did so not necessarily because they were Muslims, Christians, or Hindus, but perhaps because they were individuals committed to promoting religious pluralism.
If I feel barriers creeping back up, I can refer back to the book to reinforce the benefits.
According to Walsh, one of the advantages of the CD-ROM course is the ability to refer back to the materials at any time.
Readers, whether they are farmers, dealers or salespeople, can refer back to a print ad weeks after a publication arrives.