recover from

recover from (someone or something)

1. To return to good health after some illness or injury. Often used in the continuous tense to indicate an ongoing recovery. My brother is still recovering from malaria after coming back from his trip to Kenya. I'm still recovering from a broken ankle, so I'm afraid I won't be coming on the ski trip in December.
2. To return to stable, competitive, or composed position or status after some difficult, troublesome, or threatening situation. Things are better on the whole, but many businesses haven't yet recovered from the economic crisis. The team managed to recover from a disastrous start to the game, and they're now in a position where they could possibly win the whole thing. Georgina always finds it hard to recover from her in-laws' visits.
3. To get something back that had been taken or possessed by someone or something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "recover" and "from." I haven't been able to recover my money from the company I invested in yet. They recovered the ball from the other team within range of a field goal.
See also: recover

recover something from someone or something

to retrieve or salvage something from someone, something, or some place. The police recovered my purse from the thief who had taken it. Mary recovered her deposit from the failed bank.
See also: recover

recover from someone or something

to get over an experience with someone or something. My great-uncle just left, and it will take a day or two to recover from him. I hope I recover from his visit soon.
See also: recover

recover from something

to recuperate from a disease. I hope I recover from this cough soon. She recovered from her cold soon enough to go on the trip.
See also: recover
References in classic literature ?
Edgar Caswall was the first to recover from the interruption of the falling kite.
But then, you see, I had firmly realised this, that she would sooner recover from our separation than from our marriage; that her love for me, pretty and poignant and dramatic while it lasted, was a book- born, book-fed dream, which must die soon or late,--the sooner the better for the peace of the dreams that in the course of nature would soon spring up to take its place.
muttered Mazarin, unable to recover from his astonishment.
a floppy disk or CD) on an intermittent basis is no longer an adequate solution to recover from data loss, nor is strictly relying on occasional scheduled off-site, tape or server data storage methods.
To improve, your body must recover from training and adapt to a higher level of training stress.
Runners vary greatly in how long it takes to recover from and adapt to a workout.
The picture is not a bleak one, however, since people can and do recover from mental illness.
If people who recover from other illnesses can cope on their own, recovered mental patients should be able to do so, too.