reconcile (oneself) to (something)

(redirected from reconcile themselves to)

reconcile (oneself) to (something)

To accept or come to terms with something one must deal with, especially an undesirable, difficult, or troubling situation or set of circumstances. We had finally reconciled ourselves to a life without children, when against all odds Linda managed to become pregnant! I've reconciled myself to never truly loving my job.
See also: reconcile
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

reconcile oneself to something

to grow to feel comfortable with an undesirable or challenging situation. John reconciled himself to living alone. Anne reconciled herself to having to wear glasses.
See also: reconcile
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
When Canada passed under British domination, and the old French trading houses were broken up, the voyageurs, like the coureurs des bois, were for a time disheartened and disconsolate, and with difficulty could reconcile themselves to the service of the new- comers, so different in habits, manners, and language from their former employers.
For the 48 per cent of Britons who are Remainers but who must somehow reconcile themselves to life outside the EU, or for the vast majority of Breixteers who would like to see some sort of reasonable accommodation with the EU, that alignment is not unreasonable.
Those who stayed at home had to reconcile themselves to low wages and the repressive atmosphere against unionism.
The strategy makers of the PPP and PML-N cannot be blamed for hoping that once they begin their promised movement ('save Abu'), they are going to be joined by a large number of people who cannot quite reconcile themselves to the huge price in terms of the cost of living etc the current government is asking them to pay in search of the naya Pakistan.
They will have to reconcile themselves to a majoritarian polity."
As the men grow apart, and eventually back toward each other, they struggle to reconcile themselves to the new secrets they feel compelled to keep (and the ones that they don't want to keep at all).
Patients must often reconcile themselves to 'seeing pain as part of the cancer experience,' while believing that there is hope beyond one's initial fears and apprehensions.
Palestinians are killed by the Israeli military on a regular basis under the guise of 'crowd control.' Zionist leaders argued that if Palestinians could not reconcile themselves to Zionism, then force majeure, not a compromise of goals, was the only possible response.
It is a sadness that has enveloped communities the length and breadth of the UK, and no doubt far beyond, as the friends, families and colleagues of those who were lost try to reconcile themselves to the fact they will never see loved ones again.
Some news networks and pundits encourage the protesters to reconcile themselves to Trump presidency and strengthen connections with families, communities, and organizations as the most important preventive approach.
A few weeks ago, a small number of Republicans began to reconcile themselves to the idea that a President Trump wouldn't be so bad; but this stopped when Trump continued apparently to encourage violence.
Meanwhile Eppleton won't have last week's centurion, Dean Musther, or Paul Davidson when they travel to play Brandon, and just one week after losing overseas star Anand Singh for the rest of the summer fourth-placed Willington now have to reconcile themselves to the fact that Jamie Dass' season is over after the opening bowler fractured his foot playing football.
Here, Sarlo argues that Borges's international prestige has eventually forced leftist literary intellectuals in Argentina to reconcile themselves to his central position in the national literature.
The point I have made previously and would reiterate again is: how can the WAG reconcile themselves to their decision regarding Presumed Consent for organ donation, however meaningful it may appear in their eyes, and the likely delays and ability to cope with increased need for emergency operations when the expected availability of organs occurs.
Many other animal-rights activists--feeling a desperate need to address such matters as the slaughter of animals to satisfy humans' desire for meat-based diets and the torture and destruction of animals in university and commercial research laboratories--contrarily resort to physical confrontations and vandalism, unwilling as they are to reconcile themselves to the harm inflicted on animals, to await the enlightenment of humans about the suffering that animals acutely experience, and to anticipate what Smith projects as the inevitable development of cloned meat products that will obviate the practice of raising and slaughtering farm animals.