recognition


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flash with anger

 and flash with recognition; flash with eagerness
[for someone's eyes] to "glimmer" or seem to communicate a particular quality or excitement. Her green eyes flashed with anger. Ellen's eyes flashed with recognition when she saw me.
See also: anger, flash

change, alter, etc. beyond/out of (all) recogˈnition

change, etc. such a lot that people do not recognize you, it, etc: I went back to Birmingham after 20 years and it had changed beyond all recognition.She had changed beyond all recognition since I last saw her.
See also: beyond, of, out, recognition
References in classic literature ?
Tarzan looked out across the familiar vista with no faintest gleam of recognition in his eyes.
But he was always seriously glad to be with Villa and Harley and to receive recognition from them next after Jerry.
Crayford tried once more to attract his attention--to win his recognition while there was yet time.
A faint light of recognition glimmered in his eyes.
The reader will perhaps imagine the sensations which now arose in Jones to have been so sweet and delicious, that they would rather tend to produce a chearful serenity in the mind, than any of those dangerous effects which we have mentioned; but in fact, sensations of this kind, however delicious, are, at their first recognition, of a very tumultuous nature, and have very little of the opiate in them.
Yonder where the storms rush down into the sea, and the snout of the mountain drinketh water, shall each on a time have his day and night watches, for HIS testing and recognition.
And for his sake and for those like him, must I perfect MYSELF: therefore do I now avoid my happiness, and present myself to every misfortune--for MY final testing and recognition.
Before considering true memory, it will be well to consider two things which are on the way towards memory, namely the feeling of familiarity and recognition.
Recognition in this sense does not necessarily involve more than a habit of association: the kind of object we are seeing at the moment is associated with the word "cat," or with an auditory image of purring, or whatever other characteristic we may happen to recognize in.
There is, however, another sense of the word, in which we mean by recognition, not knowing the name of a thing or some other property of it, but knowing that we have seen it before In this sense recognition does involve knowledge about the Fast.
There are, however, several points in which such an account of recognition is inadequate.
Thus, if I recognize a thing, the occasion of its previous existence in virtue of which I recognize it forms part of "my experience" by DEFINITION: recognition will be one of the marks by which my experience is singled out from the rest of the world.
It is sometimes suggested, by those who favour behaviourist views, that recognition consists in behaving in the same way when a stimulus is repeated as we behaved on the first occasion when it occurred.
He had lived (without being aware of it) on those spiritual truths that he had sucked in with his mother's milk, but he had thought, not merely without recognition of these truths, but studiously ignoring them.
Little did I think then--little did I think afterwards when our pleasant holiday had drawn to an end--that the opportunity of serving me for which my grateful companion so ardently longed was soon to come; that he was eagerly to seize it on the instant; and that by so doing he was to turn the whole current of my existence into a new channel, and to alter me to myself almost past recognition.
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