reckon

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Related to reckons: fixable, insofar, harken back

(someone or something) to be reckoned with

A person or thing considered to be especially strong, influential, or difficult to defeat. Most commonly used in the phrase "a force to be reckoned with." Despite the higher age of its star players, they are still a team to be reckoned with. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to be reckoned with in the courtroom.
See also: reckon

a force to reckon with

A person or thing considered to be strong, powerful, or difficult to defeat. A variant of the more common "a force to be reckoned with." They say the young boxer is a force to reckon with, so I'm betting he'll win the match tonight. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to reckon with in the courtroom.
See also: force, reckon

be a force to be reckoned with

To be strong, powerful, or difficult to defeat. They say the young boxer is a force to be reckoned with, so I'm betting he'll win the match tonight. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to be reckoned with in the courtroom.
See also: force, reckon

force to be reckoned with

A person or thing considered to be strong, powerful, or difficult to defeat. They say the young boxer is a force to be reckoned with, so I'm betting he'll win the match tonight. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to be reckoned with in the courtroom.
See also: force, reckon

reckon (someone or something) among (someone or something)

To consider someone or something to belong to or be a part of some particular group of like people or things. While she is a really great person, I don't reckon patience among one of her strongest virtues. I hope you know that I reckon you among my very best friends. He reckons himself among the greatest writers of this century, but he's really just pretentious.
See also: among, reckon

reckon (someone or something) as (someone or something)

To consider or think of someone or something in a particular way or as being some particular thing. I've always reckoned you as a friend, Jennifer. Analysts are already reckoning this as one of the most influential presidencies in the history of the country.
See also: reckon

reckon (someone or something) into (something)

To include or figure some number or people or things into a greater sum or calculation. Be sure you reckon Janet's husband and kids into your numbers for the people coming to the reception. We haven't reckoned these sales into the total figures for this quarter.
See also: reckon

reckon for (something)

obsolete To be held accountable for something; to settle accounts for something. These are sins that must be reckoned for before we pass from this Earth. You will be asked to reckon for the debts you have accrued while here.
See also: reckon

reckon in

To include or figure some number or people or things into a greater sum or calculation. A noun or pronoun can be used between "reckon" and "in." Be sure you reckon Janet's husband and kids in your numbers when you're counting everyone who's coming to the reception. We haven't reckoned in these sales yet, so the figures for this past financial quarter are a little off.
See also: reckon

reckon on (someone or something)

1. To consider or anticipate something as a factor in some decision, situation, or outcome. I thought we'd have enough money for a deposit on a house, but we hadn't reckoned on needing to pay for Sophie's trip to the emergency room. They reckoned on spending about $2,000 on flights and hotels in Europe.
2. To depend or rely on someone or something. I have always reckoned on my father for advice. I just don't know what to do now that he's gone. We are reckoning on the support of the other political party to pass this legislation.
See also: on, reckon

reckon upon (someone or something)

1. To consider or anticipate something as a factor in some decision, situation, or outcome. (A more formal and old-fashioned variant of "reckon on.") They didn't reckon upon the overwhelmingly negative reaction to their announcement. We reckoned upon running into a few obstacles when we first started planning this project. The criminal hadn't reckoned upon a detective being aboard the train with him.
2. To depend or rely on someone or something. I have always reckoned upon my father for advice. I just don't know what to do now that he's gone. We must not reckon on their concurrence on this matter, for they shall not change their position.
See also: reckon, upon

reckon with (someone or something)

To prepare for, deal with, or take into account someone or something. The new president will have to reckon with the angry voices of all those who voted for him if he fails to deliver on his campaign promises. Not only do I have to pay for the car to be fixed, but I now have to reckon with a big increase in my car insurance premiums. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to be reckoned with in the courtroom.
See also: reckon

reckon without (one's) host

To plan without taking into account all the necessary or important factors or people. It was originally used to describe one who did not consult one's host, such as an innkeeper, when calculating one's lodging expenses. A: "You made plans for Mother's Day without even asking your mom what she wants to do?" B: "I know, I really reckoned without my host on that one."
See also: host, reckon, without

reckon without (someone or something)

To fail to consider or anticipate someone or something as a factor in some decision, situation, or outcome. I thought we'd have enough money for a deposit on a house, but we reckoned without needing to pay for Sophie's trip to the emergency room. Too many companies reckon without the pitfalls that make insurance like this an absolute necessity.
See also: reckon, without
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

force to be reckoned with

Fig. someone or something that is important and powerful and must not be ignored. Walter is a force to be reckoned with. Be prepared to deal with him. The growing discontent with the political system is a powerful force to be reckoned with.
See also: force, reckon

reckon someone as someone or something

to perceive someone as someone or something. I reckoned her as a more thoughtful individual than she turned out to be. Mary reckoned Scott as a constant irritation, and she was right on the button.
See also: reckon

reckon someone or something among something

to judge someone or something to belong among a select group. I reckon Donna among the best tennis pros in the country. We reckon this automobile among the most advanced in the world.
See also: among, reckon

reckon someone or something into something

 and reckon someone or something in
to figure someone or something in; to include someone or something in one's calculations. I will reckon Jane into the total number of guests. I reckoned in a few too many people.
See also: reckon

reckon with someone or something

to deal with someone or something; to cope with someone or something. I have to reckon with the troublesome Mr. Johnson this afternoon. Mary knew just exactly how she had to reckon with the bill collector.
See also: reckon

reckon without someone

to fail to think about someone. He thought he'd get away with his crime, but he reckoned without the FBI agents. He had thought he was gone for sure, but he had reckoned without the paramedics.
See also: reckon, without
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

force to be reckoned with

see under reckon with.
See also: force, reckon

reckon with

1. Take into account, be prepared for, as in The third-party movement is a force to be reckoned with during the primaries. This usage was first recorded in 1885.
2. Deal with, as in Your lost wallet isn't the only problem we have to reckon with. Also see take into account.
See also: reckon
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a — to be reckoned with (or to reckon with)

a thing or person of considerable importance or ability that is not to be ignored or underestimated.
2002 New Internationalist Now nearly 80, the ex-Harvard Pro is still full of brio and a force to be reckoned with.
See also: reckon
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

a force to be ˈreckoned with

a person or thing that has a lot of power and influence and should therefore be treated seriously: The increased size of the country’s army means that it is now a force to be reckoned with.Be very careful how you deal with her because she’s a force to be reckoned with.
See also: force, reckon
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

reckon on

v.
To expect and take something into account; bargain on something: The farmers hadn't reckoned on an early frost. Reckon on spending $250 for a hotel room in New York.
See also: on, reckon

reckon with

v.
To take someone or something into account; deal with someone or something: The new governor will have to reckon with a large budget deficit. Now that this candidate has the support of the unions, she is definitely someone to be reckoned with.
See also: reckon

reckon without

v.
To fail to consider or deal with someone or something; ignore someone or something: They thought it would be an easy victory, but they had reckoned without the determination of their enemy.
See also: reckon, without
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
And they reckon that tax dodgers rather than tax payers will pick up the entire tab.
They reckon he's lookin' forra big 'owse in Owton Manor.
I reckon she's winding me up just to get me to kick the habit.
Regulars who are good at arithmetic reckon that since Mr Harwood ordered his first half at the bar in 1939 he has downed 497 barrels of b eer.
The firm says it carried out a survey of potential 4x4 buyers and most of those quizzed reckoned the H2 was a new Jeep.
Sousa reckons Cardiff will overcome Leicester in today's semifinal and then also account for the winners of the Blackpool-Nottingham Forest tie at Wembley.
If you have stamina, and I reckon Quwetwo has plenty, forcing tactics tend to work better over the longer trip and he will get picked up by specialist two milers in the Supreme Novices'.
JOZY ALTIDORE reckons his time in the enemy's lair will help the USA shock England in their opening World Cup clash.
The rapper, whose real name is Dwayne Michael Carter Jr, reckons his personal style has evolved throughout his career.
The side under-achieved terribly, fans voted with their feet by not going to games and 20 per cent of those taking part in our survey reckon the final whistle being blown was the biggest highlight!
And the former CD Tenerife star (left) reckons he has learned a lot from playing in the hectic SPL.
Byline: Matt Williams reckons Kingaroo will be found out going back up to 1m
Kerry McFadden reckons you can be addicted to tattoos.
Cuckolded Stephen, 39, reckons there's an army of Casanovas in Port Talbot who woo married women away while their husbands are at work.
LINFIELD boss David Healy reckons Kyle Lafferty has found the management team who can help tame his ways and finally get the best out of him.