reckoning


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Related to reckoning: day of reckoning

Dutch reckoning

obsolete A bill or other account of charges that is not itemized or detailed in any way and that is usually irregularly high. The disparaging use of the word "Dutch" is a reference to the fierce rivalry between England and the Dutch in the 17th century. At the end of our stay in the country hotel, we were a little nonplussed at the Dutch reckoning with which we were presented by the concierge.
See also: Dutch, reckoning

reckon without (one's) host

To plan without taking into account all the necessary or important factors or people. It was originally used to describe one who did not consult one's host, such as an innkeeper, when calculating one's lodging expenses. A: "You made plans for Mother's Day without even asking your mom what she wants to do?" B: "I know, I really reckoned without my host on that one."
See also: host, reckon, without

day of reckoning

The day on which something must be confronted or becomes unavoidable. This term originated in the Bible. Well, it's the day of reckoning now—whether you studied or not, you have to take the test.
See also: of, reckoning

reckon with (someone or something)

To prepare for, deal with, or take into account someone or something. The new president will have to reckon with the angry voices of all those who voted for him if he fails to deliver on his campaign promises. Not only do I have to pay for the car to be fixed, but I now have to reckon with a big increase in my car insurance premiums. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to be reckoned with in the courtroom.
See also: reckon

out of the reckoning

Not in a position of possible success, importance, or impact. Most often used in relation to sports and athletes. Primarily heard in UK. With the stunning defeat, the former champions have been knocked out of the reckoning for a league title. It looks like this injury could take the captain out of the reckoning for the rest of the season.
See also: of, out, reckoning

in the reckoning

In a position of possible success, importance, or impact. Most often used in relation to sports and athletes. Primarily heard in UK. With the huge upset victory, the team is now in the reckoning for a chance at the championship. He'll have to perform a lot better in the next match if he wants to remain in the reckoning for the Manchester team.
See also: reckoning

into the reckoning

Into a position of possible success, importance, or impact. Most often used in relation to sports and athletes. Primarily heard in UK. The team's former star is looking to come back into the reckoning now that his injury is fully healed. The exhibition match gives lesser-known players a chance to force their way into the reckoning.
See also: reckoning

reckon on (something)

To consider or anticipate something as a factor in some decision, situation, or outcome. I thought we'd have enough money for a deposit on a house, but we hadn't reckoned on needing to pay for Sophie's trip to the emergency room. They reckoned on spending about $2,000 on flights and hotels in Europe.
See also: on, reckon

reckon without

To fail to consider or anticipate something as a factor in some decision, situation, or outcome. I thought we'd have enough money for a deposit on a house, but we reckoned without needing to pay for Sophie's trip to the emergency room. Too many companies reckon without the pitfalls that make insurance like this an absolute necessity.
See also: reckon, without

reckon (someone or something) among (someone or something)

To consider someone or something to belong to or be a part of some particular group of like people or things. While she is a really great person, I don't reckon patience among one of her strongest virtues. I hope you know that I reckon you among my very best friends. He reckons himself among the greatest writers of this century, but he's really just pretentious.
See also: among, reckon

reckon (someone or something) as (someone or something)

To consider or think of someone or something in a particular way or as being some particular thing. I've always reckoned you as a friend, Jennifer. Analysts are already reckoning this as one of the most influential presidencies in the history of the country.
See also: reckon

reckon in

To include or figure some number or people or things into a greater sum or calculation. A noun or pronoun can be used between "reckon" and "in." Be sure you reckon Janet's husband and kids in your numbers when you're counting everyone who's coming to the reception. We haven't reckoned in these sales yet, so the figures for this past financial quarter are a little off.
See also: reckon

reckon (someone or something) into (something)

To include or figure some number or people or things into a greater sum or calculation. Be sure you reckon Janet's husband and kids into your numbers for the people coming to the reception. We haven't reckoned these sales into the total figures for this quarter.
See also: reckon

short reckonings make long friends

Settling debts or returning borrowed items as quickly as possible helps to maintain healthy friendships. I know you won't be able to pay me all this money back right away, but just remember that short reckonings make long friends. I hate having something that someone lent to me, because I know that short reckonings make long friends.

reckon without someone

to fail to think about someone. He thought he'd get away with his crime, but he reckoned without the FBI agents. He had thought he was gone for sure, but he had reckoned without the paramedics.
See also: reckon, without

Short reckonings make long friends.

Prov. If you borrow something from a friend, pay it back as soon as possible so that the two of you remain friendly. Now that you've finished using Bert's saw, take it right back to him. Short reckonings make long friends.

the day of reckoning

or

a day of reckoning

The day of reckoning or a day of reckoning, is a time when people are forced to deal with an unpleasant situation which they have avoided until now. The day of reckoning has arrived. You can't keep writing checks on a bank account that doesn't have any money in it. We consulted a sympathetic attorney, and prepared for a day of reckoning. Note: According to the Bible, when the world ends, there will be a day of reckoning, when God will judge everyone's actions and send them either to heaven or hell.
See also: of, reckoning

day of reckoning

the time when past mistakes or misdeeds must be punished or paid for; a testing time when the degree of your success or failure will be revealed.
This expression refers to the Day of Judgement, on which, according to Christian tradition, human beings will have to answer to God for their transgressions.
See also: of, reckoning

the day of ˈreckoning

(formal) the time when good actions, successes, etc. or bad actions, failures, etc. will be made known and punished or rewarded: Tomorrow is the day of reckoning; the accountant will tell me what my profits were and how much tax I’ll have to pay.
See also: of, reckoning

in/into/out of the ˈreckoning

(especially British English) (especially in sport) among/not among those who are likely to win or be successful: Phelan is fit again and could come into the reckoning.
See also: of, out, reckoning

reckon without

v.
To fail to consider or deal with someone or something; ignore someone or something: They thought it would be an easy victory, but they had reckoned without the determination of their enemy.
See also: reckon, without
References in periodicals archive ?
I think The Reckoning is a more useful description of what's gone wrong in the Reagan years.
Whether it is considered sentence by sentence or as a narrative whole, The Reckoning is much too long.