reckon

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force to be reckoned with

A person or thing considered to be strong, powerful, or difficult to defeat. They say the young boxer is a force to be reckoned with, so I'm betting he'll win the match tonight. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to be reckoned with in the courtroom.
See also: force, reckon

reckon without (one's) host

To plan without taking into account all the necessary or important factors or people. It was originally used to describe one who did not consult one's host, such as an innkeeper, when calculating one's lodging expenses. A: "You made plans for Mother's Day without even asking your mom what she wants to do?" B: "I know, I really reckoned without my host on that one."
See also: host, reckon, without

be a force to be reckoned with

To be strong, powerful, or difficult to defeat. They say the young boxer is a force to be reckoned with, so I'm betting he'll win the match tonight. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to be reckoned with in the courtroom.
See also: force, reckon

a force to reckon with

A person or thing considered to be strong, powerful, or difficult to defeat. A variant of the more common "a force to be reckoned with." They say the young boxer is a force to reckon with, so I'm betting he'll win the match tonight. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to reckon with in the courtroom.
See also: force, reckon

reckon with (someone or something)

To prepare for, deal with, or take into account someone or something. The new president will have to reckon with the angry voices of all those who voted for him if he fails to deliver on his campaign promises. Not only do I have to pay for the car to be fixed, but I now have to reckon with a big increase in my car insurance premiums. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to be reckoned with in the courtroom.
See also: reckon

(someone or something) to be reckoned with

A person or thing considered to be especially strong, influential, or difficult to defeat. Most commonly used in the phrase "a force to be reckoned with." Despite the higher age of its star players, they are still a team to be reckoned with. The attorney may look petite and meek, but she's a force to be reckoned with in the courtroom.
See also: reckon

reckon on (something)

To consider or anticipate something as a factor in some decision, situation, or outcome. I thought we'd have enough money for a deposit on a house, but we hadn't reckoned on needing to pay for Sophie's trip to the emergency room. They reckoned on spending about $2,000 on flights and hotels in Europe.
See also: on, reckon

reckon without

To fail to consider or anticipate something as a factor in some decision, situation, or outcome. I thought we'd have enough money for a deposit on a house, but we reckoned without needing to pay for Sophie's trip to the emergency room. Too many companies reckon without the pitfalls that make insurance like this an absolute necessity.
See also: reckon, without

force to be reckoned with

Fig. someone or something that is important and powerful and must not be ignored. Walter is a force to be reckoned with. Be prepared to deal with him. The growing discontent with the political system is a powerful force to be reckoned with.
See also: force, reckon

reckon someone as someone or something

to perceive someone as someone or something. I reckoned her as a more thoughtful individual than she turned out to be. Mary reckoned Scott as a constant irritation, and she was right on the button.
See also: reckon

reckon someone or something among something

to judge someone or something to belong among a select group. I reckon Donna among the best tennis pros in the country. We reckon this automobile among the most advanced in the world.
See also: among, reckon

reckon someone or something into something

 and reckon someone or something in
to figure someone or something in; to include someone or something in one's calculations. I will reckon Jane into the total number of guests. I reckoned in a few too many people.
See also: reckon

reckon with someone or something

to deal with someone or something; to cope with someone or something. I have to reckon with the troublesome Mr. Johnson this afternoon. Mary knew just exactly how she had to reckon with the bill collector.
See also: reckon

reckon without someone

to fail to think about someone. He thought he'd get away with his crime, but he reckoned without the FBI agents. He had thought he was gone for sure, but he had reckoned without the paramedics.
See also: reckon, without

force to be reckoned with

see under reckon with.
See also: force, reckon

reckon with

1. Take into account, be prepared for, as in The third-party movement is a force to be reckoned with during the primaries. This usage was first recorded in 1885.
2. Deal with, as in Your lost wallet isn't the only problem we have to reckon with. Also see take into account.
See also: reckon

a — to be reckoned with (or to reckon with)

a thing or person of considerable importance or ability that is not to be ignored or underestimated.
2002 New Internationalist Now nearly 80, the ex-Harvard Pro is still full of brio and a force to be reckoned with.
See also: reckon

a force to be ˈreckoned with

a person or thing that has a lot of power and influence and should therefore be treated seriously: The increased size of the country’s army means that it is now a force to be reckoned with.Be very careful how you deal with her because she’s a force to be reckoned with.
See also: force, reckon

reckon on

v.
To expect and take something into account; bargain on something: The farmers hadn't reckoned on an early frost. Reckon on spending $250 for a hotel room in New York.
See also: on, reckon

reckon with

v.
To take someone or something into account; deal with someone or something: The new governor will have to reckon with a large budget deficit. Now that this candidate has the support of the unions, she is definitely someone to be reckoned with.
See also: reckon

reckon without

v.
To fail to consider or deal with someone or something; ignore someone or something: They thought it would be an easy victory, but they had reckoned without the determination of their enemy.
See also: reckon, without
References in periodicals archive ?
4-litre GLS with an average of 26,000 miles covered, costing under pounds 16,000, is reckoned to be unbeatable.
Apart from being a genuine 99-year-old automotive antique, A 13 is just 12 away from the mother of all numbers, A 1, reckoned to be worth around pounds 300,000.
The firm says it carried out a survey of potential 4x4 buyers and most of those quizzed reckoned the H2 was a new Jeep.
This is a team to be reckoned with in the Eastern Conference,'' Bryant said.
I think Microsoft is still incredibly powerful and is a real force to be reckoned with.
Yesterday, the City had a calmer look and reckoned the pounds 900million price tag might just be achievable.
Last year more than two-thirds of companies reckoned they would not get caught using illegal software, according to surveys.
But 12 per cent reckoned they justified a nine, 18 per cent an eight and 25 per cent seven.