receive

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Related to receiving: Receiving stolen property
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at the receiving end

In the position of getting something (from someone else). Typically, the one "at the receiving end" is the recipient of some behavior or action perceived to be harmful or negative. Look, I know you're having a tough time at work, but I'm sick of being at the receiving end of your temper every night! I'd hate to be at the receiving end of one of his roundhouse kicks.
See also: end, receive

be on the receiving end

To be in the position of getting something (from someone else). Typically, the one "on the receiving end" is the recipient of some behavior or action perceived to be harmful or negative. Look, I know you're having a tough time at work, but I'm sick of being on the receiving end of your temper every night! I'd hate to be on the receiving end of one of his roundhouse kicks.
See also: end, on, receive

it is better to give than to receive

It is more virtuous to give or yield something than to receive something. The idea is Biblical in origin. It is better to give than to receive, so we're going to donate these dolls to people who are less fortunate. Right, honey?
See also: better, give, receive

it is more blessed to give than to receive

It is more virtuous to give or yield something than to receive something. The phrase comes from the Bible's Acts of the Apostles. It is more blessed to give than to receive, so we're going to donate these dolls to people who are less fortunate. Right, honey?
See also: blessed, give, more, receive

on the receiving end

In the position of getting something (from someone else). Typically, the one "on the receiving end" is the recipient of some behavior or action perceived to be harmful or negative. Look, I know you're having a tough time at work, but I'm sick of being on the receiving end of your temper every night! I'd hate to be on the receiving end of one of his roundhouse kicks.
See also: end, on, receive

receive (one) into (something or some place)

To admit, accept, or welcome one into some group, organization, or location. The government has indicated it will be willing to accept the refugees into the country. We're receiving some new members into the order next week.
See also: receive

receive (one's) just deserts

To receive that which one deserves, especially a punishment or unfavorable outcome. (Note: The phrase is often misspelled as "just desserts," due to the pronunciation of "deserts" and "desserts" being the same in this context.) The CEO cheated his clients out of nearly $4 million, but he received his just deserts when he was stripped of everything he owned and sent to prison.
See also: desert, just, receive

receive (someone or something) with open arms

1. To greet someone very happily and eagerly; to give someone a very warm, enthusiastic welcome. When my brother left for the military, he and I didn't really get along too well, but now that he's coming home, I can't wait to receive him with open arms. It was a little intimidating starting a new job at such a large firm, but everyone there received me with open arms.
2. To be very pleased and enthusiastic about something, especially that which is new or unexpected. The president has announced a reversal on his controversial policy, and many people are receiving the news with open arms.
See also: arm, open, receive

receive as (something)

1. To obtain something (from someone) in some particular capacity of for some particular reason. I received this watch as a gift for my 50 years of service to the company. We received a large payment from the government as an investment in our project.
2. To admit, welcome, or accept someone in a particular manner or capacity. Typically followed by "guest." I'm willing to receive you as a guest as a favor to my wife, but do not think that this courtesy extends any further than this evening. The embassy plans on receiving the former rebel leader as a guest of honor.
See also: receive

receive back

To obtain, take, or acquire someone or something back (from someone, something, or some place). A noun or pronoun can be used between "receive" and "back." I finally received back the things the police had confiscated during their search. We received the patient back from the ICU so we could continue to monitor his progress.
See also: back, receive

receive from (someone or something)

1. To obtain, take, or acquire something from someone or something. A noun or pronoun is used between "receive" and "from." I received a very stern letter from the bank after failing to meet my minimum loan repayments again. The professor is receiving an award from the university for her work in cancer research.
2. To admit, accept, or welcome someone from some location or thing. Her friends and family were waiting to receive her from the airport after her long and arduous journey. The state police were ready to receive the suspect from the county jail following his formal arraignment.
See also: receive

receive the fright of (one's) life

To experience an extreme and sudden sensation of shock, surprise, or fear. I received the fright of my life when I noticed someone standing right behind me. Mary received the fright of her life as the car ahead of her swerved across traffic.
See also: fright, life, of, receive

receive word (from someone or something)

To get or be given a message or communication (from someone or something). We're receiving word that the suspect is moving south on Broadway in a white pickup truck. I received word from my brother that his flight will be delayed. He's received word from a higher authority to begin the evacuation.
See also: receive, someone, word

sneck posset

archaic A rejection, refusal, or cold reception; a closed door (as on a visitor). Primarily heard in UK. After receiving a veritable sneck posset from his wealthy distant relations, Milton set to drinking in the town's tavern for want of any other recourse.
See also: posset, sneck

word

1. A message from someone or something. I just got word that Diana landed in New York.
2. slang An expression of affirmation. A: "That concert was amazing!" B: "Word."

It is better to give than to receive.

 and It is more blessed to give than to receive.
Prov. It is more virtuous to give things than to get them. (Biblical.) Susan told her children, "Instead of thinking so much about what you want for your birthday, think about what to give your brothers and sisters for their birthdays. Remember, it is better to give than to receive." Our charity encourages you to share the good things you have. It is more blessed to give than to receive.
See also: better, give, receive

receive someone as someone or something

to welcome and accept someone as someone or something. The king received the ambassador as an honored guest. They said they would receive their former guest as a welcome visitor.
See also: receive

receive someone into something

to welcome someone into something, some place, or some organization. Everyone received the new member into the club with eager congratulations. We received them into our homes and fed them well.
See also: receive

receive someone or something back

to get someone or something back. Martha received her husband back after his escapade. I sent a letter off with the wrong postage and received it back two weeks later.
See also: back, receive

receive someone with open arms

 and welcome someone with open arms 
1. Lit. to greet someone with arms spread wide to hug someone. His mother greeted him with open arms at the door.
2. Fig. to greet someone eagerly. I'm sure they wanted us to stay for dinner. They received us with open arms. When I came home from college, the whole family welcomed me with open arms.
See also: arm, open, receive

receive something from some place

to get and accept something from some place. I just received a letter from Budapest! Mary received a package from Japan.
See also: place, receive

receive something from someone

to get and accept something from someone. Tony received a sweater from his grandfather for his birthday. Who did you receive this from?
See also: receive

receive word

(from someone or something) Go to word (from someone or something).
See also: receive, word

*word (from someone or something)

messages or communication from someone or something. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; hear ~; receive ~.) We have just received word from Perry that the contract has been signed.

on the receiving end

In the situation of recipient, especially of something unpleasant, as in It seems I'm always on the receiving end of his bad moods. [c. 1930]
See also: end, on, receive

be at (or on) the receiving end

be subjected to something unpleasant. informal
See also: end, receive

be on/at the reˈceiving end (of something)

(informal) be the person that an action, etc. is directed at, especially an unpleasant one: He’s been on the receiving end of a lot of criticism recently.
See also: end, on, receive

Word

1. and Word up. interj. Correct.; Right. I hear you, man. Word.
2. interj. Hello. (see also What’s the (good) word?.) Word. What’s new? A: Word. B: Word.
References in periodicals archive ?
There were too few instances of virus with the K65R mutation in patients receiving the 200 mg dose to draw firm conclusions; however, the viral load reduction in patients with the K65R mutation treated with lower doses of Reverset suggests that the compound is also active against this mutation.
Since receiving is executed more often in a game than any other skill, your #1 job is to catch 100% of all pitches.
Instead of receiving cash for the sale of their business (which would be taxed in the year of receipt), shareholders may spread their sale's gain over several years by receiving back an installment promissory note.
Door prizes and mementos meant that everybody was a winner with gifts ranging from spa packages to fondue sets and everyone receiving flowers and custom-made certificates of appreciation too.
There's a temptation for a firm to keep its new exclusive listing a secret until the firm has had a chance to bring in its own buyers to insure the firm of receiving a full commission on a sale.
Consumers who are dissatisfied with the quality or reliability of the services they are receiving can ask the agency to send a different worker, but if consumers are dissatisfied with the agency management's response to complaints, there may be little recourse open to them if this is the only authorized provider agency in their area.
The Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) and the National Coalition for Adult Immunization have joined the CDC in the "Flu/Pneumo 2000 Campaign" to increase the number of Medicare beneficiaries receiving pneumococcal and influenza vaccinations (both of which are covered by Medicare).
A payment from another country transmitted into the network is treated no differently by a receiving depository financial institution than an entry originated domestically.
M was 62 and receiving Social Security retirement benefits in 1997.
It is possible to dictate to the receiving team how many people they can rush, and to hamper an opponent's ability to set a formal return.
Assuming that the entity receiving the dividend owns more than 50 percent of the dividend payor, 100 percent of the dividends would be deductible under Sec.
Also winning in the Senior String Division were the Enso Quartet of Rice University in Houston, receiving the Silver Medal and $2,000, and the Harding Trio of CIM, receiving the Bronze Medal and $1,000.
This document rules out the increasing practice of married couples, where one is a non-Catholic, receiving Communion together regularly.
A business receiving incentive payments under the Oklahoma Quality Jobs Program Act is not eligible for the Oklahoma income tax investment/jobs credit, and is denied several other exemptions and credits otherwise allowable under the State's tax laws.(10) The Act was made subject to a "sunset" and legislative evaluation provision by a 1994 amendment.
The stimulant known as Ritalin displays pluses and minuses in preschoolers receiving the drug for attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to the first large, long-term study of the drug's effects in such youngsters.