receive


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Related to receive: Recieve

receive the fright of (one's) life

To experience an extreme and sudden sensation of shock, surprise, or fear. I received the fright of my life when I noticed someone standing right behind me. Mary received the fright of her life as the car ahead of her swerved across traffic.
See also: fright, life, of, receive

sneck posset

archaic A rejection, refusal, or cold reception; a closed door (as on a visitor). Primarily heard in UK. After receiving a veritable sneck posset from his wealthy distant relations, Milton set to drinking in the town's tavern for want of any other recourse.
See also: posset, sneck

receive (one's) just deserts

To receive that which one deserves, especially a punishment or unfavorable outcome. (Note: The phrase is often misspelled as "just desserts," due to the pronunciation of "deserts" and "desserts" being the same in this context.) The CEO cheated his clients out of nearly $4 million, but he received his just deserts when he was stripped of everything he owned and sent to prison.
See also: desert, just, receive

at the receiving end

In the position of getting something (from someone else). Typically, the one "at the receiving end" is the recipient of some behavior or action perceived to be harmful or negative. Look, I know you're having a tough time at work, but I'm sick of being at the receiving end of your temper every night! I'd hate to be at the receiving end of one of his roundhouse kicks.
See also: end, receive

receive (someone or something) with open arms

1. To greet someone very happily and eagerly; to give someone a very warm, enthusiastic welcome. When my brother left for the military, he and I didn't really get along too well, but now that he's coming home, I can't wait to receive him with open arms. It was a little intimidating starting a new job at such a large firm, but everyone there received me with open arms.
2. To be very pleased and enthusiastic about something, especially that which is new or unexpected. The president has announced a reversal on his controversial policy, and many people are receiving the news with open arms.
See also: arm, open, receive

be on the receiving end

To be in the position of getting something (from someone else). Typically, the one "on the receiving end" is the recipient of some behavior or action perceived to be harmful or negative. Look, I know you're having a tough time at work, but I'm sick of being on the receiving end of your temper every night! I'd hate to be on the receiving end of one of his roundhouse kicks.
See also: end, on, receive

on the receiving end

In the position of getting something (from someone else). Typically, the one "on the receiving end" is the recipient of some behavior or action perceived to be harmful or negative. Look, I know you're having a tough time at work, but I'm sick of being on the receiving end of your temper every night! I'd hate to be on the receiving end of one of his roundhouse kicks.
See also: end, on, receive

word

1. A message from someone or something. I just got word that Diana landed in New York.
2. slang An expression of affirmation. A: "That concert was amazing!" B: "Word."

receive as (something)

1. To obtain something (from someone) in some particular capacity of for some particular reason. I received this watch as a gift for my 50 years of service to the company. We received a large payment from the government as an investment in our project.
2. To admit, welcome, or accept someone in a particular manner or capacity. Typically followed by "guest." I'm willing to receive you as a guest as a favor to my wife, but do not think that this courtesy extends any further than this evening. The embassy plans on receiving the former rebel leader as a guest of honor.
See also: receive

receive back

To obtain, take, or acquire someone or something back (from someone, something, or some place). A noun or pronoun can be used between "receive" and "back." I finally received back the things the police had confiscated during their search. We received the patient back from the ICU so we could continue to monitor his progress.
See also: back, receive

receive from (someone or something)

1. To obtain, take, or acquire something from someone or something. A noun or pronoun is used between "receive" and "from." I received a very stern letter from the bank after failing to meet my minimum loan repayments again. The professor is receiving an award from the university for her work in cancer research.
2. To admit, accept, or welcome someone from some location or thing. Her friends and family were waiting to receive her from the airport after her long and arduous journey. The state police were ready to receive the suspect from the county jail following his formal arraignment.
See also: receive

receive (one) into (something or some place)

To admit, accept, or welcome one into some group, organization, or location. The government has indicated it will be willing to accept the refugees into the country. We're receiving some new members into the order next week.
See also: receive

receive word (from someone or something)

To get or be given a message or communication (from someone or something). We're receiving word that the suspect is moving south on Broadway in a white pickup truck. I received word from my brother that his flight will be delayed. He's received word from a higher authority to begin the evacuation.
See also: receive, someone, word

It is better to give than to receive.

 and It is more blessed to give than to receive.
Prov. It is more virtuous to give things than to get them. (Biblical.) Susan told her children, "Instead of thinking so much about what you want for your birthday, think about what to give your brothers and sisters for their birthdays. Remember, it is better to give than to receive." Our charity encourages you to share the good things you have. It is more blessed to give than to receive.
See also: better, give, receive

receive someone as someone or something

to welcome and accept someone as someone or something. The king received the ambassador as an honored guest. They said they would receive their former guest as a welcome visitor.
See also: receive

receive someone into something

to welcome someone into something, some place, or some organization. Everyone received the new member into the club with eager congratulations. We received them into our homes and fed them well.
See also: receive

receive someone or something back

to get someone or something back. Martha received her husband back after his escapade. I sent a letter off with the wrong postage and received it back two weeks later.
See also: back, receive

receive someone with open arms

 and welcome someone with open arms 
1. Lit. to greet someone with arms spread wide to hug someone. His mother greeted him with open arms at the door.
2. Fig. to greet someone eagerly. I'm sure they wanted us to stay for dinner. They received us with open arms. When I came home from college, the whole family welcomed me with open arms.
See also: arm, open, receive

receive something from some place

to get and accept something from some place. I just received a letter from Budapest! Mary received a package from Japan.
See also: place, receive

receive something from someone

to get and accept something from someone. Tony received a sweater from his grandfather for his birthday. Who did you receive this from?
See also: receive

receive word

(from someone or something) Go to word (from someone or something).
See also: receive, word

*word (from someone or something)

messages or communication from someone or something. (*Typically: get ~; have ~; hear ~; receive ~.) We have just received word from Perry that the contract has been signed.

on the receiving end

In the situation of recipient, especially of something unpleasant, as in It seems I'm always on the receiving end of his bad moods. [c. 1930]
See also: end, on, receive

be at (or on) the receiving end

be subjected to something unpleasant. informal
See also: end, receive

be on/at the reˈceiving end (of something)

(informal) be the person that an action, etc. is directed at, especially an unpleasant one: He’s been on the receiving end of a lot of criticism recently.
See also: end, on, receive

Word

1. and Word up. interj. Correct.; Right. I hear you, man. Word.
2. interj. Hello. (see also What’s the (good) word?.) Word. What’s new? A: Word. B: Word.
References in periodicals archive ?
When they receive Communion standing, it is strongly recommended that, coming up in procession, they should make a sign of reverence before receiving the Blessed Sacrament.
Selling shareholders can receive the buyer's stock tax free by a statutory merger (known as an "A" reorganization); the acquisition by the buying corporation of the selling corporation's shareholders' shares in exchange for the buying corporation's stock (known as a "B" reorganization); or the selling corporation's receipt of the buying corporation's shares in exchange for the selling corporation's assets (known as a "C" reorganization).
I believe this sharing should take place immediately when a broker receives a signed exclusive agreement with a seller.
The SSA and the Code are to be construed similarly to determine the earnings for which an individual will receive credit for benefit purposes and on what earnings an individual must pay Social Security tax; see 20 CFR Section 404.
Perhaps the most pronounced concern that responding companies identified, however, is this: not only would the information returns they receive be useless but the resulting "mismatches" -- between reported income and "real" income (taking into account the fiscal year, the method of accounting, differences between gross proceeds and income, and differences between which entity receives the information return and which one reports the income for tax purposes) -- would consume valuable time and resources, with virtually no increased revenue flowing to the fisc.
Under then-existing NYSL rules, A did not receive his entire winnings in 1989; rather, he received the right to approximately $1.
451-1(a), income is includible in gross income under the accrual method when all the events have occurred that fix the right to receive it and the amount can be determined with reasonable accuracy.
The doctrine of constructive receipt generally applies whenever a cash-basis taxpayer is entitled to money, the money is immediately available to him, and his failure to receive it is due entirely to his own volition.
Unfortunately, exchanging parties may have difficulty meeting the procedure's time requirements, which mandate that the exchanging party receive the replace ment property within 180 days of the EAT acquiring title to it.
Between 1996 and 2000, more than half of HIV-infected infants in a large pediatric HIV surveillance project were born to women who missed opportunities to obtain perinatal HIV prevention care-18% to women who received no prenatal care, 29% to women who had prenatal care but were not tested for HIV before delivery, and 9% to women who had HIV diagnosed during pregnancy but did not receive antiretroviral treatment.