really and truly

really and truly

cliché Absolutely; with total honesty or sincerity. I am really and truly sorry for what happened. A: "Do you love me, Margaret?" B: "Oh, I do, Jacob—really and truly!"
See also: and, really, truly
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

really and truly

Genuinely, undoubtedly. This redundancy (really and truly mean the same thing, but the repetition makes for emphasis) dates from the eighteenth century. The OED holds it is a North American children’s locution, but nearly all of its citations, ranging from Henry Fielding (1742) to the present, are from adult books. Thomas Macaulay used it in his The History of England (1849), “The king is really and truly a Catholic.”
See also: and, really, truly
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
See also:
References in classic literature ?
"I guess you'll think it's really and truly," prophesied Nancy, exultingly, nodding her head to Pollyanna over the armful of dresses she had taken from the closet.