reality

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take a bite of the reality sandwich

To recognize and address certain delusions, flaws, or misconceptions regarding a particular situation or task at hand. Most often used as office jargon in a business or place of work. I know you think this new product will solve all of our problems, but you really need to take a bite of the reality sandwich.
See also: bite, of, reality, sandwich, take

detached from reality

Psychologically, emotionally, or intellectually separated from the outside world or from realistic, logical thought. When my mental illness was at its worst, I became completely detached from reality. The council's plan to build an interstate through the middle of town is just nonsense, it's completely detached from reality!
See also: detached, reality

bite of the reality sandwich

Recognition of certain delusions, flaws, or misconceptions regarding a particular situation or task at hand. Most often used as office jargon in a business or place of work. I know you think this new product will solve all of our problems, but you really need to take a bite of the reality sandwich. If Becky still thinks she's getting that promotion, even though she's late every day, she seriously needs a bite of the reality sandwich!
See also: bite, of, reality, sandwich

bring (one) back to reality

To cause one who is fantasizing or being overly optimistic to remember or consider the true nature of something. Someone needs to bring him back to reality because there's no way he's getting into that school with his mediocre grades. I was excited to book a vacation until my nearly-depleted bank account brought me back to reality.
See also: back, bring, reality

in reality

Actually; really; in fact. A lot of people believe the total number to be low, when, in reality, it's the highest it's ever been.
See also: reality

nothing could be further from (something)

What we are discussing is the complete opposite of something. They claim that the tax overhaul was designed with lower- and middle-class earners in mind, but nothing could be further from the truth! Nothing could be further from reality—I have never accepted bribes in my entire career.
See also: could, further, nothing

reality check

An event or outcome that forces one to accept or reevaluate the reality of one's position or situation. I think the government's latest round of legislation is a reality check to those still holding onto the belief that they had lower-class citizens' best interests in mind. The loss against Scotland is bound to be a reality check for England that they need to rethink their strategy on the field.
See also: check, reality

lose touch with reality

To no longer have a firm or clear understanding of real life; to lose one's ability for clear, rational thought. A possessive pronoun can be used between "lose" and "reality." The poor guy sort of lost touch with reality after the death of his children. I feel like I'm losing my touch with reality lately—I think I might need to see a psychiatrist.
See also: lose, reality, touch

reality of the situation

What is actually happening in or true about a particular situation or scenario. The reality of the situation is that the company will go bankrupt in the next three years if we don't significantly improve our revenue streams. I know you're worried about him, but the reality of the situation is that he's just a toddler going through a bit of a boisterous phase.
See also: of, reality, situation

bring someone back to reality

to force someone to face reality. The rain shower brought her back to reality. Liz was brought back to reality by a rude shock.
See also: back, bring, reality

in reality

viewing things realistically; really. Jane dreamed it was snowing, but in reality, it was very warm. John looks happy, but in reality, he is miserable.
See also: reality

lose touch with reality

to began to think unrealistically; to become unrealistic. I am so overworked that I am losing touch with reality. The psychotic criminal had lost touch with reality.
See also: lose, reality, touch

reality of the situation

the truth or actuality of the situation; the way the situation really is. The reality of the situation is that we must act right now. Let's face the reality of the situation and go out and get jobs so we can pay our bills.
See also: of, reality, situation

virtual reality

Fig. computer imaging that attempts to mimic real scenes or places. The movie had so much virtual reality that the regular photographic scenes began to look funny.
See also: reality

in reality

Actually, in fact, as in He may seem slow to you, but in reality he's very intelligent. [Second half of 1600s]
See also: reality

reality check

An assessment to determine if one's circumstances or expectations conform to reality, as in Time for a reality check-wasn't this supposed to be a money-making enterprise? [Slang; second half of 1900s]
See also: check, reality

a reality check

COMMON A reality check is something that forces you to accept the truth of a situation. This defeat is a reality check after two victories against reasonably good opposition. Today's poll is a reality check for those who believe that the government faces certain defeat.
See also: check, reality

in reˈality

used to say that a situation is different from what has just been said or from what people believe: Outwardly she looked confident but in reality she felt extremely nervous.
See also: reality

in reality

In fact; actually.
See also: reality
References in periodicals archive ?
Paul Price, previously chief executive officer of Creative Realities has been named CEO of the combined company and will also serve as a director.
So leaders who are willing to grapple with changing realities, and are committed to building adaptive organizations, need courage Alas, this trait is not discussed much in the leadership literature, and certainly not much in MBA or executive development classrooms.
This cannot be taken to mean, however, that realities of the higher level are brought down to the level of the lower so as to be counted as one of the existents of that lower level.
In the future, Baptists must see themselves as pilgrims in transition between realities, always moving toward new ways of operating.
Both denote timeless, non-contingent realities that are discontinuous with the world of causality and relationality.
Not only Americans, but most people around the world subscribe to one or more socially constructed "realities" that contradict everyday experience: That men are smarter than women, or that there exists a Supreme Being who takes a personal interest in our careers, romances, and efforts to lose weight.
Social, physical, and personal realities operate in conjunction to construct and define an individual's reality.
As a black man, I find this a particularly disheartening and disempowering sensation; often, while many of my colleagues retreat obliviously to coffeehouses to continue their discussions of theoretical matters, the pressures and realities of real "space" invariably seem to prevent me from enjoying such leisure.
Beyond the obvious biological facts -- such as the fact that red blood cells transport oxygen -- there are biological realities which reach right up into our social lives, our mental and cultural lives.
This book mingles the realities of life and death, truth and goodness.
The term hooks us with the excitement of creating and experiencing different realities.
The values that we are called to live out in our mission are not passive realities. They require us to make conscious choices that follow the gospel, even if it leads us to a reality that is different.
Developing realistic and workable answers to these questions means that aspiring physicians must come to grips with 11 realities of health care management.
In the debate over the importance of language versus "facts," Neubauer takes his argument one step further by claiming that "socioeconomic 'realities' are constantly affected by mental attitudes, by the linguistic and semiotic conceptualizations that people impose upon their otherwise chaotic impressions" (9).
Correction: In "Can Linguistic Realities Kill Us?," by Charles G.