read into (something)

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read into (something)

1. To find, infer, or attribute some additional meaning or different interpretation based on what is presented. A lot of people have been reading into the government's announcement, seeing it as some indication of a major policy shift. I'm sure what he said was harmless. I wouldn't read into it too much if I were you.
2. To approve someone for access to restricted information about a classified program. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "read" and "into." Often used in passive constructions. The diplomat refused to testify after having been read into the controversial government program.
3. Of a computer, to acquire data from something, such as a program, and enter it into memory or storage. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "read" and "into." The command triggers the operating system to read the program into its random access memory.
See also: read
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

read something into something

Fig. to attach or attribute a new or different meaning to something; to presume inferences as one reads something. This statement means exactly what it says. Don't try to read anything else into it. Am I reading too much into your comments?
See also: read
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

read into

Find an additional hidden or unintended meaning in something that is said or written, as in What I read into that speech on foreign policy is that the Vice President plans to run for President . [Late 1800s]
See also: read
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

read into

v.
To attribute some interpretation or meaning to something, especially an unintended meaning: He's reading things into the text that the author never intended. Don't read too much into her remark—it is hardly representative of her opinion.
See also: read
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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