readjust to (something)

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readjust to (something)

1. To adapt, conform, or acclimate to a new or altered situation or environment. I've got to readjust to the way I do my work now that I'm in this new company. I always find it hard readjusting to daylight savings time.
2. To change or alter something in order to adapt, conform, or acclimate it to a new or altered situation or environment. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "readjust" and "to." We're trying to readjust our business model following the recent merger. She needs to readjust her expectations to the way things have turned out.
See also: readjust, to
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

readjust to someone or something

to make a new adjustment to someone or something. Please make an attempt to readjust your work schedule for the next two weeks. I don't think I can readjust to this climate.
See also: readjust, to
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The film vividly captures the psychological as well as logistical difficulties they have in readjusting to civilian life.
The Sunderland Armed Forces Network hopes to improve the health of many former service personnel readjusting to life in Civvy Street.
Some ex-servicemen and women who have put life and limb on the line can have problems readjusting to civvy street, away from the regimentation of the military.
THE LAZY DAYS OF SUMMER ARE OVER and consumers are readjusting to the fast-paced schedule of work, school, sports and homework, which always involves preparing a healthy dinner each night.
Veterans returning home from war zones face problems readjusting to normal life and now many are facing a difficult economy and job market as well.
A riveting novel of readjusting to one's home town, "Courage of Fear" is highly recommended reading for adult fiction readers.
KENNY Richey may be euphoric after being told he can walk free, but readjusting to normal life will not be easy, says psychologist Ian Stephen.
The recently released inmate finds it a struggle readjusting to life on the outside.