reading

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cold reading

1. The reading aloud of a script or performative text, as for television, theater, or film, with little or no rehearsal, practice, or study in advance. It's always a little awkward doing a cold reading for the first time, because you know things will be much different once everyone has had a chance to get familiar with the script.
2. A technique or series of techniques used by paranormal performers (such as mentalists, psychics, spiritual mediums, fortune tellers, etc.) in which the appearance of clairvoyance is achieved by gleaning personal details about a subject through the use of intuition, broad questions, and educated guesses and assumptions. It's amazing how convincing psychics can seem when all they're doing is giving a cold reading of people in the audience. I can't believe you fell for that fortune teller nonsense—it was just a cold reading!
See also: cold, reading

read the small print

To make oneself aware of the specific terms, conditions, restrictions, limitations, etc., of an agreement, contract, or other document (often printed in very small type and thus easy to go unnoticed). The terms of the loan look pretty good at face value, but be sure to read the small print, or you could find yourself in a heap of trouble down the line. I know reading the small print can be tedious, but it's always important to know what you're getting yourself into!
See also: print, read, small

read the fine print

To make oneself aware of the specific terms, conditions, restrictions, limitations, etc., of an agreement, contract, or other document, which are often printed in very small type and thus easy to miss. The terms of the loan look pretty good at face value, but be sure to read the fine print or you could find yourself in a heap of trouble down the line. I know reading the fine print can be tedious, but it's always important to know what you're getting yourself into.
See also: fine, print, read

read (something) cover to cover

To read something in its entirety, from beginning to end. Most commonly refers to reading materials that literally have a front cover and back cover, such as books or magazines. That book was so good that I read it cover to cover in one sitting. Every month I wait for the magazine to come in the mail and then I spend a Saturday afternoon reading it from cover to cover.
See also: cover, read

read the runes

To analyze current trends to predict what will happen in the future, likened to fortune telling. In this phrase, "runes" are esoteric, letter-like symbols associated with magic. Primarily heard in UK. All the social media companies are trying to read the runes to see what the next big thing will be, but most trends are impossible to predict.
See also: read

read up on (something)

To increase one's knowledge of a topic by reading about it. I better read up on the quadratic equation before I try to teach it tomorrow.
See also: on, read, up

read between the lines

To infer or understand the real or hidden meaning behind something's appearance. He gave a very diplomatic explanation, but if you read between the lines, it seems like he was fired for political reasons. Reading between the lines, it looks the like the company is bracing for a hostile takeover.
See also: line, read

read between the lines

Fig. to infer something (from something else); to try to understand what is meant by something that is not written explicitly or openly. After listening to what she said, if you read between the lines, you can begin to see what she really means. Don't believe every thing you read literally. Learn to read between the lines.
See also: line, read

read between the lines

Perceive or detect a hidden meaning, as in They say that everything's fine, but reading between the lines I suspect they have some marital problems . This term comes from cryptography, where in one code reading every second line of a message gives a different meaning from that of the entire text. [Mid-1800s]
See also: line, read

read between the lines

COMMON If you read between the lines, you understand what someone really means, or what is really happening in a situation, even though it is not stated openly. He was reluctant to go into details, but reading between the lines it appears that he was forced to leave. Note: You can also talk about the message between the lines. He didn't give a reason, but I sensed something between the lines. He was forced to confess to the crime, but he tried to send a message between the lines at his trial.
See also: line, read

read the runes

BRITISH, LITERARY
If you read the runes, you decide what is likely to happen in the future by considering what is happening now. Back in 1989, he was the first of the east European leaders to read the runes and make the jump from communism to nationalism. Note: Runes were an alphabet used in northern Europe until medieval times. The letters were often thought to have magical properties.
See also: read

read between the lines

look for or discover a meaning that is hidden or implied rather than explicitly stated.
1994 American Spectator Those familiar with the virulent animosity in this element of black racism can read between the lines to get a fuller picture.
See also: line, read

read the runes

try to forecast the outcome of a situation by analysing all the significant factors involved. British
The runes were an ancient Germanic alphabet once used in northern Europe, each character of which was supposed to have a secret magical significance. Small stones and pieces of bone engraved with these characters were used to try to foretell the future.
See also: read

ˌread between the ˈlines

find or look for a hidden or extra meaning in something a person says or writes, usually their real feelings about something: Reading between the lines, it was obvious that he was feeling lonely.
See also: line, read

read between the lines

To perceive or detect an obscure or unexpressed meaning: learned to read between the lines of corporate annual reports to discern areas of fiscal weakness.
See also: line, read

read between the lines

Infer an unexpressed meaning. An early method of transmitting written coded messages was to write the secret information in invisible ink between the lines of a document. The recipient would then learn the information by reading between the lines. The phrase came to mean gaining an insight in the context of reading something into another person's words or behavior—and often both. For example, you, your spouse, and teenage son are invited to a family gathering. Your son's reaction when he heard the news was to stare at the floor and mutter, “Well, okay if I gotta.” Reading between the lines, you'd say that he's not crazy about going.
See also: line, read
References in classic literature ?
The reading of the extracts from the letters and the extracts from the Diary began.
The reading of this outrageous letter provoked a question from the Bench.
Oh, I know what you've been doing," said Tom; "you've been reading the English at the end.
The subject of reading aloud was farther discussed.
He remained stubbornly silent, gazing at Weyrother's face, and only turned away his eyes when the Austrian chief of staff finished reading.
After she had read and marked for two hours, he said, "We will take the volume up-stairs--and the pencil, if you please-- and in case of reading in the night, we can pursue this task.
I shall try not to use authority, however, and I do not expect to speak here of all my reading, whether it has been much or little, but only of those books, or of those authors that I have felt a genuine passion for.
Every strange or partly familiar word encountered in his reading was immediately jotted down, and later, when a sufficient number had been accumulated, were typed and pinned to the wall or looking- glass.
After reading one or two of the more coherent passages Henry recoiled from the ever-darkening horror of the story.
Hour after hour she sat in the dusky room, with one ray of light on her book, reading to the boy, who lay with shaded eyes silently enjoying the only pleasure that lightened the weary days.
On a couch opposite sat a man, half undressed for bed, reading a book.
What the Roman and Grecian multitude could not hear, after the lapse of ages a few scholars read, and a few scholars only are still reading it.
In so doing, we do not only consult our own dignity and ease, but the good and advantage of the reader: for besides that by these means we prevent him from throwing away his time, in reading without either pleasure or emolument, we give him, at all such seasons, an opportunity of employing that wonderful sagacity, of which he is master, by filling up these vacant spaces of time with his own conjectures; for which purpose we have taken care to qualify him in the preceding pages.
He was reading a book, and thinking of what he was reading, and stopping to listen to Agafea Mihalovna, who gossiped away without flagging, and yet with all that, all sorts of pictures of family life and work in the future rose disconnectedly before his imagination.
Eugene drew a chair to the fire by which he was having his wine and reading the evening paper, and brought a glass, and filled it for good fellowship's sake.