read (one's) mind

(redirected from read his mind)

read (one's) mind

To know what one is thinking. You read my mind—that's exactly where I want to go to dinner! I'm sorry, but I can't read your mind. You need to tell me these things.
See also: mind, read

read someone's mind

Fig. to guess what someone is thinking. You'll have to tell me what you want. I can't read your mind, you know. If I could read your mind, I'd know what you expect of me.
See also: mind, read

read someone's mind

Discern what someone is thinking or feeling, as in He often finished her sentences for her, almost as though he could read her mind. [Late 1800s]
See also: mind, read

ˌread somebody’s ˈmind/ˈthoughts

(informal) understand what somebody is thinking, feeling, planning, etc: I can’t read your mind! If you don’t tell me what’s worrying you, I can’t help you.
See also: mind, read, thought
References in classic literature ?
Once or twice the lawyer looked up and asked a question of Szedvilas; the other did not know a word that he was saying, but his eyes were fixed upon the lawyer's face, striving in an agony of dread to read his mind. He saw the lawyer look up and laugh, and he gave a gasp; the man said something to Szedvilas, and Jurgis turned upon his friend, his heart almost stopping.
"I can't read his mind," Nick said once, in the middle of the night.
His chip has 96 electrodes that read his mind with the help of a computer.
For that first try I read his mind, knew he was going to go for that gap, which was why I was able to get on his shoulder.
She falls in love with a vampire specifically because she cannot read his mind. Her lover, Bill, is kidnapped by his ex-lover Lorena, a vampire who is notoriously vicious.
I read his mind and knew his thoughts - a legend here was born
Hedges even spoiled his daily airings on the street, for he became convinced that she could read his mind. His eyes no sooner fastened on some likely looking girl than he became aware of Mrs.
No scientist in 30 years, after running tests on Geller, has been able to dispute the man's paranormal powers and upon meeting the sceptical author, Geller (who has been bending spoons since the age of three) read his mind and replicated a drawing by Margolis' son with his back turned.
However, if anyone wanted to read his mind, it might be worth noting an observation from tonight's programme, that Stalin and his like relied "to a very large extent on the collusion of perfectly ordinary people who should have known better, but didn't".
Everyone is hanging on his every word, trying to read his mind. There's not that much talking.