razzmatazz


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razzmatazz

and razzamatazz (ˈræz(ə)məˈtæz)
n. deceptive talk; hype. Cut out the razzamatazz. How dumb do you think I am?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Razzmatazz Theatre School has 54 children who come for a three-hour class every Saturday.
Razzmatazz has shown a fair level of form over four and six bends, but will have to dig deep as the race starts to unwind.
Last year, in an effort to attract new sponsors and give the game some razzmatazz, the 'concept' was having players wearing red and blue shirts - which apparently also helped the viewers tell the players apart.
The new emphasis will be on razzmatazz, and BBC bosses feel there is no place for honest John.
Coventry trainer Caroline Weatherall's youngster showed good early speed to turn prominently and led on the run-in to deny Stanton Bluebell and then hold the challenge of Razzmatazz by a short-head in 29.
The game also includes pool and an astonishing level of visual detail with all the razzmatazz that attends the World Championships at The Crucible.
England should turn on the style and introduce more American-type razzmatazz to one-day cricket.
THE ability to ignore the razzmatazz and the din of the big day at Epsom is one of the most vital attributes of a Derby winner and is one of the tests the potentially volatile Motivator must pass if he is to join the race's illustrious roll of honour, writes Jon Lees.
But jackpots are likely to stick at around pounds 4 million each midweek after the initial razzmatazz.
The underlying suggestion was, though, that media hype and razzmatazz before an event doesn't compare with the real thing when it happens, not always unexpectedly, in a sublime moment that will be forever etched in one's treasured memories.
JORDAN'S Brazil Grand Prix victory will get a razzmatazz ceremony after all in Italy this weekend.
United States razzmatazz went into overdrive yesterday as Bill Clinton was sworn in for his second term as president.
Suffice to say that the `fun' derived from racing comes from within the spectator himself and not from contrived party-pieces and so-called razzmatazz.
All the glitz, all the razzmatazz and all the self-congratulation cannot disguise the reality that the euro has not lived up to its billing.
I wish to turn Mr Prest's complaint on its head and state that celebration in a razzmatazz type of way by the winning jockey only adds to the sport and, in my opinion, is likely to attract new owners and racegoers, as it demonstrates fun.