raving


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be stark raving mad

To be totally crazy. Don't listen to a word he says, he's stark raving mad! You're stark raving mad if you think that plan will work.
See also: mad, raving, stark

(stark) raving bonkers

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think me raving bonkers, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving bonkers, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving mad after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: bonkers, raving

(stark) raving mad

Totally crazy or eccentric; filled with an excessive amount of emotion, especially anger or excitement. I know you'll probably think I'm raving mad, but I sold all my possessions and am moving to a small village in China. The announcement drove fans stark raving mad, as it will be the first new album the band has released in over 10 years. The boss is stark raving bonkers after I bungled the expense reports.
See also: mad, raving

rant and rave

To complain angrily, forcefully, and at great length (about someone or something). You should spend less time ranting and raving about how unfair your professor is and spend more time actually studying the material. He was quite upset when he came home, so I let him rant and rave for a little while until he calmed down.
See also: and, rant, rave

rave over (something)

To give wildly enthusiastic praise for something. My mom was really impressed with your cooking—she spent the whole evening raving over it! Everyone raves over this movie, but I thought it was pretty mediocre to be honest.
See also: over, rave

rave about (something)

To give wildly enthusiastic praise for something. My mom was really impressed with your cooking—she spent the whole evening raving about it! Everyone raves about this movie, but I thought it was pretty mediocre to be honest.
See also: rave

rant and rave (about someone or something)

to shout angrily and wildly about someone or something. Barbara rants and raves when her children don't obey her. Bob rants and raves about anything that displeases him.
See also: and, rant, rave

stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

rant and rave

Talk loudly and vehemently, especially in anger, as in There you go again, ranting and raving about the neighbor's car in your driveway. This idiom is a redundancy, since rant and rave mean just about the same thing, but probably survives on account of its alliterative appeal.
See also: and, rant, rave

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark

ˌrant and ˈrave

(disapproving) show that you are angry by shouting or complaining loudly for a long time: He stood there for about twenty minutes ranting and raving about the colour of the new paint.
See also: and, rant, rave

(stark) raving ˈmad/ˈbonkers

(informal) completely crazy; suddenly very angry with somebody: Are you stark raving mad, jumping off a moving train?When I told her I’d crashed her car, she went stark raving bonkers.
See also: bonkers, mad, raving

stark raving mad

Insane. Literally this term means “completely, wildly crazy,” a graphic description of manic behavior. Versions of it have appeared since the sixteenth century, including Jonathan Swift’s, “There’s difference between staring and stark mad” (Polite Conversation, 1738). More recently, Robert Barnard piled up colloquial synonyms: “‘Mad as a hatter,’ said Gillian Soames complacently. ‘Stark raving bonkers. Up the wall. Round the twist.’” (Death and the Chaste Apprentice, 1989).
See also: mad, raving, stark
References in periodicals archive ?
People who love the music would keep on raving without the drugs.
For example, a female university varsity athlete who was interviewed was concerned about her teammates findings out about her raving and, for this reason, actively hid her raver identity.
There are people who go all out in terms of costumes and that sort of thing are concerned and that's one of the neat things about it, you can't tell how long someone's been raving based on their costume or based on their outward appearance or how much they understand about raving based on their outward appearance.
In its ideal form, then, rave is a "quiet" social movement and raving a depoliticized form of resistance than can usefully and progressively alter everyday practices, as McRobbie (1993, 1994) has argued.
Moreover, and without discounting the importance of considering and highlighting the variations of rave resistance noted throughout this section or the empowerment that can be gained from raving, it is crucial to be sensitive to the multitude of ways that a social/youth 'movement' can be interpreted by theorists, and the related potential for these commentators to overstate the actual resistive potential of the group.
Consider also the finding that experienced ravers tended to retrospectively suggest that in their early days of raving, when they 'lost themselves in the partying', they were actually lost (a contrast to Malbon's assertion that rave is the practice of "losing yourself to find yourself").
That is to say, just because youth 'know what they are doing' does not make raving resistant--but by the same token, it does not make them duped or unaware either.
1999a "A Snapshot of Raving in Toronto." Presentation given at forum called "Raving in Toronto" put on by the Toronto Drug Awareness Coalition, North York (Toronto), Ontario, Canada.
The party's national leader, Mr Chris Driver, caused a sensation last year when he was elected as a Raving Loony councillor in Kent prior to the formation of the Rock 'n' Roll group.
And third, the most powerful, overriding argument to emerge from the report was that the over-regulation of raves would drive raves underground, subsequently amplifying the risks associated with raving in Toronto.
What we see, therefore, is that through the subpolitical movement which developed around raving in Toronto -- at times cross-articulating with organizations representing other, more social distant causes -- the moralizing discourse constructed to characterize raves as risks was subverted by organizations working on behalf of Toronto's rave communities, subsequently amplifying the risks associated with banning raves from city spaces.
"That's my first big winner since joining Hove and I'm very pleased with Raving Black," said Cahill.
Draw for the final: 1 Raving Black, 2 Clairkeith Codey, 3 Sign Major, 4 Kylegrove Cougar (m), 5 Wise Opinion (w), 6 Useful Asset (w)