rave

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rant and rave

To complain angrily, forcefully, and at great length (about someone or something). You should spend less time ranting and raving about how unfair your professor is and spend more time actually studying the material. He was quite upset when he came home, so I let him rant and rave for a little while until he calmed down.
See also: and, rant, rave

rave over (something)

To give wildly enthusiastic praise for something. My mom was really impressed with your cooking—she spent the whole evening raving over it! Everyone raves over this movie, but I thought it was pretty mediocre to be honest.
See also: over, rave

rave about (something)

To give wildly enthusiastic praise for something. My mom was really impressed with your cooking—she spent the whole evening raving about it! Everyone raves about this movie, but I thought it was pretty mediocre to be honest.
See also: rave

rant and rave (about someone or something)

to shout angrily and wildly about someone or something. Barbara rants and raves when her children don't obey her. Bob rants and raves about anything that displeases him.
See also: and, rant, rave

rave about someone or something

 
1. to rage in anger about someone or something. Gale was raving about Sarah and what she did. Sarah raved and raved about Gale's insufferable rudeness.
2. to sing the praises of someone or something. Even the harshest critic raved about Larry's stage success. Everyone was raving about your excellent performance.
See also: rave

rave over someone or something

to recite praises for someone or something. The students were just raving over the new professor. Donald raved over the cake I baked. But he'll eat anything.
See also: over, rave

stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

rant and rave

Talk loudly and vehemently, especially in anger, as in There you go again, ranting and raving about the neighbor's car in your driveway. This idiom is a redundancy, since rant and rave mean just about the same thing, but probably survives on account of its alliterative appeal.
See also: and, rant, rave

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark

ˌrant and ˈrave

(disapproving) show that you are angry by shouting or complaining loudly for a long time: He stood there for about twenty minutes ranting and raving about the colour of the new paint.
See also: and, rant, rave

rave about

or rave over
v.
To speak or write about something or someone with wild enthusiasm: The dinner guests raved about the roasted duck. The critic raved over the new movie.
See also: rave

rave

n. a party; a wild celebration. Let’s have a little rave next Friday.

rant and rave, to

To speak wildly and angrily about some circumstance or issue. This expression was first recorded as rave and rant, or literally, “raived and ranted,” in James MacManus’s The Bend of the Road (1898). The turnaround came soon thereafter and the term always appears in this form today. David Leavitt used it in Family Dancing (1984), “It’s easy for you to just stand there and rant and rave.”
See also: and, rant

stark raving mad

Insane. Literally this term means “completely, wildly crazy,” a graphic description of manic behavior. Versions of it have appeared since the sixteenth century, including Jonathan Swift’s, “There’s difference between staring and stark mad” (Polite Conversation, 1738). More recently, Robert Barnard piled up colloquial synonyms: “‘Mad as a hatter,’ said Gillian Soames complacently. ‘Stark raving bonkers. Up the wall. Round the twist.’” (Death and the Chaste Apprentice, 1989).
See also: mad, raving, stark
References in periodicals archive ?
Their decision to block access to the rave, rather than go in and try to break-up up the illegal gathering, was criticised in some quarters, but police have defended their tactics and have gathered intelligence on how to restrict a similar kind of event happening again.
What you can expect at a Big Fish Little Fish family rave is not just top DJs playing club classics, but also bubble machines, club visuals, giant balloons and a giant parachute dance.
A pesar de que ambos tipos de raves comparten numerosos elementos e incluso participantes, existen diferencias.
Dorothy Fairburn, CLA north regional director, r said: "The police and local councils take raves very seriously but their powers are limited once an event "Illegal rave organisers have little concern for the safety f and welfare of those attending the events, which also cause a great deal of disruption to local communities and often result in damage being caused to property and land.
Raves in Lane County drew widespread attention in September when Hamilton allowed a three-day event called "Where Life Begins" at 93948 Swamp Creek Road, his remote, 90-acre parcel northwest of Fern Ridge.
After an introductory chapter, Anderson prepares her analysis with a chapter dedicated to EDM events, providing a six-fold taxonomy: underground parties, corporate raves, music festivals, monthlies, weeklies, and superstar one-offs.
"Raves can cause a great deal of disruption and often result in damage being caused.
Organisers said in the face of the economic crisis, unemployment and homelessness, raves like this, which were common in the late 1980s, were likely to see a resurgence.
Although previous reports (5-7) have documented widespread use of MDMA and other "club drugs" at raves since the early 1990s, this is the first known public health investigation describing the epidemiology of a cluster of MDMA-related ED visits associated with a rave.
So the story goes like this: On weekends, Liam (composer/keyboards) went to all the raves and when the clubs closed down in the early morning those ravers went on to party on the beach while Liam played a compilation of the latest rave tracks out of a van.
"Our 1U and 3U servers are excellent additions to Raves' product line because of their versatility and design to fit various military deployments," said Dave Burnett, Director of Engineering for Rave Computer.
THE Government is planning a new crackdown on illegal raves.
Similarly, the proposed federal crackdown on raves seems unlikely to deter many MDMA users--which does not mean it would have no impact.
The market for Ecstasy has begun to expand from those ravers into a broader user demographic--one that is both older and younger, more racially diverse, and includes people who do their drugs not at big raves but home alone.