rave

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rant and rave

To complain angrily, forcefully, and at great length (about someone or something). You should spend less time ranting and raving about how unfair your professor is and spend more time actually studying the material. He was quite upset when he came home, so I let him rant and rave for a little while until he calmed down.
See also: and, rant, rave

rave over (something)

To give wildly enthusiastic praise for something. My mom was really impressed with your cooking—she spent the whole evening raving over it! Everyone raves over this movie, but I thought it was pretty mediocre to be honest.
See also: over, rave

rave about (something)

To give wildly enthusiastic praise for something. My mom was really impressed with your cooking—she spent the whole evening raving about it! Everyone raves about this movie, but I thought it was pretty mediocre to be honest.
See also: rave

rant and rave (about someone or something)

to shout angrily and wildly about someone or something. Barbara rants and raves when her children don't obey her. Bob rants and raves about anything that displeases him.
See also: and, rant, rave

rave about someone or something

 
1. to rage in anger about someone or something. Gale was raving about Sarah and what she did. Sarah raved and raved about Gale's insufferable rudeness.
2. to sing the praises of someone or something. Even the harshest critic raved about Larry's stage success. Everyone was raving about your excellent performance.
See also: rave

rave over someone or something

to recite praises for someone or something. The students were just raving over the new professor. Donald raved over the cake I baked. But he'll eat anything.
See also: over, rave

stark raving mad

Cliché totally insane; completely crazy; out of control. (Often an exaggeration.) When she heard about what happened at the office, she went stark raving mad. You must be start raving mad if you think I would trust you with my car!
See also: mad, raving, stark

rant and rave

Talk loudly and vehemently, especially in anger, as in There you go again, ranting and raving about the neighbor's car in your driveway. This idiom is a redundancy, since rant and rave mean just about the same thing, but probably survives on account of its alliterative appeal.
See also: and, rant, rave

stark raving mad

Totally crazy, as in The constant uncertainty over his job is making him stark raving mad. This term, meaning "completely wildly insane," is used both hyperbolically and literally. Versions of this expression appear to have sprung from the minds of great literary figures. Stark mad was first recorded by poet John Skelton in 1489; stark raving was first recorded by playwright John Beaumont in 1648; stark staring mad was first used by John Dryden in 1693. The current wording, stark raving mad, first appeared in Henry Fielding's The Intriguing Chambermaid in 1734.
See also: mad, raving, stark

ˌrant and ˈrave

(disapproving) show that you are angry by shouting or complaining loudly for a long time: He stood there for about twenty minutes ranting and raving about the colour of the new paint.
See also: and, rant, rave

rave about

or rave over
v.
To speak or write about something or someone with wild enthusiasm: The dinner guests raved about the roasted duck. The critic raved over the new movie.
See also: rave

rave

n. a party; a wild celebration. Let’s have a little rave next Friday.
References in periodicals archive ?
But Raver says the show's creators have been careful not to withhold too much information at the risk of alienating viewers.
Indeed, if there is any way in which the link between the female raver and notions of the cyborg or nomad remains tenuous, it is perhaps due less to the comparison itself than to an ellipsis in Pini's own ethnographic accounts of the raver.
The market for Ecstasy has begun to expand from those ravers into a broader user demographic--one that is both older and younger, more racially diverse, and includes people who do their drugs not at big raves but home alone.
It's all about breaking down barriers, losing preconceptions, expanding the mind and feeling the vibe (interview, male raver, university student, 1995)
More recently, however, Raver says that researchers are not stacking "at risk" children up against middle-income children.
Raver joined Y&R as senior vice president and treasurer on March 30, 1992.
When the Gazette tracked the ravers down, they described what they were doing as a "conscious movement".
Fellow ravers are more often than not extremely friendly.
Alison Lohman as Christine Brown and Lorna Raver as Mrs Ganush in Drag Me To Hell
Raver is repulsive as the old lady, while the supporting cast fit well into their roles.
Award-winning stage actress Lorna Raver reads aloud an unabridged audiobook presentation of Lucrezia Borgia: Life, Love, and Death in Renaissance Italy, a biography that neither condemns nor exonerates the life of the notorious Renaissance femme fatale Lucrezia Borgia.
Mark Cleminson, aka MC Speed, of Clennell House, Benwell, Newcastle, is another regular raver at NRG events.
Narrator Raver has a grand time portraying the effusive Italian women who figure prominently in the story (based upon a true incident) and she voices an Irish priest and a rough-spoken boy with equal ease.
Denton said at the Hollywood Style Awards as he joined Avril Lavigne, Jessica Biel, Melinda Clarke, Kim Raver, Isaiah Washington, Anastacia and other presenters.
No raver was hurt but within hours Jessica and Alex were both arrested.