rate


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first-rate

1. adjective Excellent; of the best or highest possible quality or rank. That movie was positively first-rate! The tiny nation boasts a first-rate healthcare system.
2. adverb Very well; superbly; fantastically. I hear Joanna did first-rate on her exams last week.

at a rate of knots

Rapidly. (A boat's speed is measured in knots.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. We're going to have to move at a rate of knots to have any hope of getting there on time.
See also: knot, of, rate

at any rate

Anyway. We're going to be late, but, at any rate, we should still be there be before 9. I think your mother just tolerates me—at any rate, she certainly doesn't shower me with affection.
See also: any, rate

at that rate

In that case. At that rate, we'll never make it on time! Tanya is busy all month. At that rate, we'll never see her.
See also: rate, that

at this rate

1. At this pace. Drive faster! At this rate, we'll never get there on time! It doesn't have to be perfect. At this rate, we'll frost one cupcake every hour!
2. If this situation persists. All of my friends are getting engaged, and I'm still single. At this rate, I'll be a bridesmaid at least 10 times before I get to be a bride.
See also: rate, this

the going rate (for something)

The typical cost of something. What's the going rate for a new heating system? Ours is on the fritz. A: "$200 seems pretty steep for such a small repair!" B: "That's the going rate, I'm afraid."
See also: going, rate

X-rated

1. Carrying an X rating, as from the Motion Picture Association of America, for including extremely mature themes or content and thus made unavailable to anyone under the age of 17. For film, this rating has been changed to NC-17. Our film was originally X-rated because of the really graphic drug and sex scenes, but with a bit of editing we managed to get it down to an R rating.
2. Having, showing, or containing extremely explicit, mature content or themes, especially graphic sexual content. With such a goofy name and bright, colorful box art, how were parents supposed to know the video game would be X-rated? He got a name for himself making X-rated illustrations before moving on to what some would call more serious art.

cut-rate

Offered or sold at a low price. I told you you'd regret buying a cut-rate car like that!

rate above (someone or something)

1. To be considered more valuable, significant, or important than another person, thing, or group of people or things. I believe preserving the wellbeing of our fellow citizens rates above trying to maximize the profits of corporations. Although he is largely written off by music aficionados, he still rates above nearly every other singer on the billboards every time he releases a new album.
2. To consider someone or something to be more valuable, significant, or important than another person, thing, or group of people or things. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "rate" and "above." I wouldn't rate it above her other work, but it's still a very well-written piece of literature. We rate Sarah above any other lawyers in the city, so we have full confidence in her ability to handle this case on her own.
See also: above, rate

rate as (something)

1. To be considered as having particular rank, designation, or characterization. The company still rates as one of the most profitable businesses in the world. Some of it has become pretty clichéd by today's standards, but I'd say it still rates as a fantastic horror movie in its own right.
2. To consider someone or something to have a particular rate, designation, or characterization. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "rate" and "as." I'd have to rate that as one of the most thrilling experiences of my life. I still rate Tom as a great writer, even if his last book was a little underwhelming.
See also: rate

rate at (something)

1. To have or earn a particular rating level. The newer model is rated at a much higher energy yield than older machines. They say the battery is rated at roughly three hours per charge, but I've never gotten longer than a single hour out of it.
2. To assign someone or something a particular rating or score. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "rate" and "at." The Sunday Inquirer rated the comedian at a stellar 4.5 out of 5 stars. I personally enjoyed the film despite its flaws, but I'd probably rate it more objectively at a 6 out of 10. The packaging rates the light bulb at a Level A in energy consumption.
See also: rate

rate below (someone or something)

1. To be considered less valuable, significant, or important than another person, thing, or group of people or things. I personally believe that trying to maximize the profits of corporations rates below preserving the wellbeing of our fellow citizens. His music is very popular across the globe, even though he tends to rate below most "serious" musical artists.
2. To consider someone or something to be less valuable, significant, or important than another person, thing, or group of people or things. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "rate" and "below." It's still very well-written, but I would probably rate it below her other work. I have to rate my last driver below others I've had through your service. He was very unprofessional.
See also: below, rate

rate with (someone or something)

1. To be considered equal or comparable to someone or something else in value, ability, significance, importance, etc. Even after so many years, the company still rates with the most profitable businesses in the world. I really think she rates with the likes of Tina Turner and Aretha Franklin—her voice is just that good.
2. To consider someone or something to be equal or comparable to someone or something else in value, ability, significance, importance, etc. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "rate" and "with." Many people rate the exquisite building with the greatest pieces of architecture in the world. I still rate Tom with the best writers out there today, even if his last book was a little underwhelming.
See also: rate

at any rate

in any case; anyway. At any rate, what were we talking about? At any rate, I don't think you should quit your job.
See also: any, rate

at that rate

in that manner; at that speed. If things keep progressing at that rate, we'll be rich by next year. At that rate we'll never get the money that is owed us.
See also: rate, that

at this rate

at this speed; if things continue in the same way. (Usually of a pessimistic view.) Hurry up! We'll never get there at this rate. At this rate, all the food will be gone before we get there.
See also: rate, this

going rate

the current rate or the current charges for something. The going interest rate for your account is 10 percent. Our babysitter charges us the going rate.
See also: going, rate

rate (someone or something) above (someone or something else)

to judge someone to rank higher than someone else; to judge something to rank higher than something else. Do you rate Alice above Valerie? I rate chocolate ice cream above vanilla.
See also: above, rate

rate someone or something among something

to judge someone or something to be essentially equal to something. I rate Polly among the best of this year's class. We rate these contestants among the best ever.
See also: among, rate

rate someone or something as something

to assign a particular rating to someone or something. I rate her as a number four. The judge rated my cake as second place.
See also: rate

rate (someone or something) below (someone or something else)

to judge someone to rank lower than someone else; to judge something to rank lower than something else. I have to rate Carol below Donna in this regard. We all rate plain chocolate ice cream below rocky road ice cream.
See also: below, rate

rate (someone or something) with (someone or something else)

to judge someone or something to be equal to someone or something else. I rate Fred with Don. They are equally good. Vanilla is very nice, but I don't rate it with chocolate ice cream.
See also: rate

rate something at something

to assign a particular level of rating to something. I rate this brand at about a B-. The broker rated this stock at a buy.
See also: rate

rate something below something else Go to rate someone or something below someone or something

else.
See also: below, else, go, rate

rate with someone

to be in someone's favor; to be thought of highly by someone. Ann is great. She really rates with me. She doesn't rate with me at all.
See also: rate

at any rate

In any event, whatever the case may be; also, at least. For example, At any rate, I promise to be there even if I'm a little late, or It may not pay well, but at any rate it's a job. [Early 1600s] Also see in any case.
See also: any, rate

at this rate

Also, at that rate.
1. Progressing at this (or that) speed, as in At this rate we'll never finish in time. [Mid-1600s]
2. Under these circumstances, in that case. For example, At this rate they'll never settle their differences. [Late 1700s]
See also: rate, this

X-rated

Sexually explicit, vulgar, or obscene, as in This film should be X-rated; it's not suitable for children. This expression alludes to a rating system established for motion pictures, in which films rated X may not be viewed by persons under the age of 17. [c. 1970]

at a rate of knots

BRITISH
If someone does something at a rate of knots, they do it very quickly. The band worked at a rate of knots on the LP, often flying back to Dublin after a European show, working all night on the album. By 1935, Blyton was publishing at a rate of knots — adventures, fairy tales, mysteries. Note: The speed of ships is measured in knots. A knot is one nautical mile per hour, equivalent to 1.15 land miles per hour.
See also: knot, of, rate

at a rate of knots

very fast. British informal
A knot here is a nautical unit of speed, equal to one nautical mile per hour.
See also: knot, of, rate

at ˈany rate

(spoken)
1 used to say that a particular fact is true in spite of what has happened in the past or what may happen in the future: Well, that’s one good piece of news at any rate.
2 used to show that you are being more accurate about something that you have just said: He said he’d be here on the 5th. At any rate, I think that’s what he said.
3 used to show that what you have just said is not as important as what you are going to say: There were maybe 80 or 90 people there. At any rate, the room was packed.
See also: any, rate

at a rate of ˈknots

(British English, informal) very fast: You must have been going at a rate of knots to have finished so soon. OPPOSITE: at a snail’s pace
The speed of a boat or ship is measured in knots.
See also: knot, of, rate

at ˈthis/ˈthat rate

(spoken) if the situation continues as it is: This traffic’s terrible. At this rate we’ll never get to the airport on time.
See also: rate, that, this

the ˌgoing ˈrate (for something)

the usual amount of money paid for goods or services at a particular time: They pay slightly more than the going rate for freelance work.
See also: going, rate

cut-rate

mod. cheap; low-priced. Where are your cut-rate sweaters?

at any rate

1. Whatever the case may be; in any case: You should at any rate apologize.
2. Used to indicate a revision or correction to a previous remark: We were delighted, or at any rate satisfied, with the results.
See also: any, rate
References in periodicals archive ?
Our results revealed that heart rate decreased at the beginning of particle exposure.
An interest rate that varies with the level of short-term market interest rates is applied to seasonal credit.
To correct for these problems in obtaining an accurate accounting of all students, the event dropout rate (USDOE, 2000a) was developed as a measure of the proportion of students who drop out of school in a given year, regardless of their cohort.
Accordingly, the average AZN/EUR rate was 1.8985 manats.
9###Madagascar###4.48% annual rate of change###15-20
From this equation, it can be seen that the apparent shear rate is directly proportional to the ram rate or travel speed of the piston that is moving in the barrel against the rubber, forcing it through the orifice in the die mounted at the end of the barrel.
The Bank of Japan undertook drastic steps to lower interest rates to save domestic banks and non-financial companies after Japan's bubble burst.
Garwood argued that the +0.5 rate did not apply to its overpayment because the cross-reference indicates that only C corporations are included in the definition of corporation for purposes of interest on overpayments.
A report by Charles Westoff of the Office of Population Research at Princeton University shows that the birth rate actually increased slightly between the surveys of 1998 and 2003, from 4.7 to 4.8.
** Once the new rate takes effect, review automatic bill payments to make sure the rate change has taken effect.
2005 has been a record year of investment sales activity in Manhattan, despite eight straight increases to short-term rates, many of which had the effect of ratcheting short-term rates closer to long-term rates rather than preserving the once larger spread.
Many times on the sale of property, prior depreciation and amortization deductions will be "recaptured" and taxed at the higher 25 percent federal recapture tax rate. If instead the property is owned in a partnership, this 25 percent tax can be avoided by the redeemed partner by having the partnership redeem the client's partnership interest, rather than the partnership selling the property, resulting in the client's entire redemption gain being taxed at lower long-term capital gain rates [Treas.
They moved a portion of Ellis' bonds to shorter maturities--the date when the bond's value should be paid--because they are less sensitive to interest rate swings.
This test has a very high accuracy rate, with 94.4% sensitivity and 99.6% specificity reported (7).