rare

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(as) rare as hens' teeth

Incredibly scarce or rare; extremely difficult or impossible to find. Support for the president is as rare as hens' teeth in this part of the country.
See also: rare, teeth

(as) rare as rocking horse crap

vulgar slang Extremely rare or unlikely; all but, or most likely, impossible or non-existent. Primarily heard in Ireland. An honest person in politics? Yeah, that's as rare as rocking horse crap. I'm sorry to say, but the part this engine needs is rare as rocking horse crap. They haven't manufactured these in nearly 50 years!
See also: crap, horse, rare, rocking

(as) rare as rocking horse poo

vulgar slang Extremely rare or unlikely; all but, or most likely, impossible or non-existent. Primarily heard in Ireland. An honest person in politics? Yeah, that's as rare as rocking horse poo. I'm sorry to say, but the part this engine needs is rare as rocking horse poo. They haven't manufactured these in nearly 50 years!
See also: horse, poo, rare, rocking

(as) rare as rocking horse shit

vulgar slang Extremely rare or unlikely; all but, or most likely, impossible or non-existent. Primarily heard in Ireland. An honest person in politics? Yeah, that's as rare as rocking horse shit. I'm sorry to say, but the part this engine needs is rare as rocking horse shit. They haven't manufactured these in nearly 50 years!
See also: horse, rare, rocking, shit

(as) rare as rocking horse manure

slang Extremely rare or unlikely; all but, or most likely, impossible or non-existent. Primarily heard in Ireland. An honest person in politics? Yeah, that's as rare as rocking horse manure. I'm sorry to say, but the part this engine needs is rare as rocking horse manure. They haven't manufactured these in nearly 50 years!
See also: horse, manure, rare, rocking

a rare bird

A person or thing that is very unusual, especially due to a combination of typically incompatible features. Their latest model is a rare bird indeed, a spacious hatchback that still feels premium and elegant in its design. The film is a rare bird—funny, crass, and yet more emotionally powerful than anything I've seen all year.
See also: bird, rare

rare old time

old-fashioned An exceptionally pleasant, enjoyable, and amusing time. We always have a rare old time when the Smiths come over for a dinner party. We must do it again soon. You should come to the party on Saturday—it's sure to be a rare old time!
See also: old, rare, time

have a rare old time

a fine and enjoyable time at a party or something similar. We had a rare old time at Tom's the other night. I haven't had a rare old time like that in years.
See also: have, old, rare, time

in rare form

 
1. Fig. well prepared for a good performance; at one's best. The goalie is in rare form today; that's his third great save already. We are not exactly in rare form on Monday mornings.
2. Inf. intoxicated. Gert is in rare form, but she'll have time to sleep it off. When Harry was finally in rare form, he slid beneath the table.
See also: form, rare

rare bird, a

An exceptional individual, a unique person, as in That wife of yours is a rare bird; you're lucky to have her. This idiom, generally used as a compliment, is a translation of the Latin rara avis, which itself was used from about 1600 on and began to be translated only in the late 1800s.
See also: rare

a rare bird

LITERARY
If you call someone or something a rare bird, you mean that they are very unusual. Diane Johnson's book is that rare bird, an American novel of manners. Note: `A rare bird' is a translation of the Latin expression `rara avis', which was used by the Roman writer Juvenal in the 2nd century AD to describe a black swan. At the time, black swans were unknown, although they were later discovered in Australia.
See also: bird, rare

rare as hen's teeth

or

scarce as hen's teeth

OLD-FASHIONED
If something is as rare as hen's teeth or as scarce as hen's teeth, it is extremely rare. Record companies are becoming as rare as hen's teeth. Note: Hens do not have teeth.
See also: rare, teeth

rare (or scarce) as hen's teeth

extremely rare.
As hens do not possess teeth, the implication is that something is rare to the point of non-existence. The phrase was originally a US colloquialism, dating from the mid 19th century.
See also: rare, teeth

rare bird

an exceptional person or thing; a rarity.
The English expression is a literal translation of the Latin rara avis .
2005 Apollo Magazine Joseph Southall is that rare bird, an Arts and Crafts painter.
See also: bird, rare

(as) rare/scarce as hen’s ˈteeth

(old-fashioned) extremely rare: Critics always complain that good movies that the whole family can see together are as scarce as hen’s teeth.
This refers to the fact that hens do not have teeth.
See also: rare, scarce, teeth

a rare ˈbird

a person or thing that is unusual, often because they have/it has two very different interests or qualities: Jill is a very rare bird, a good politician and an excellent listener.This expression is a translation of the Latin idiom ‘rara avis’.
See also: bird, rare

in rare form

1. mod. well-tuned for a good performance; at one’s best. We are not exactly in rare form on Monday mornings.
2. mod. alcohol intoxicated. Gert is in rare form, but she’ll have time to sleep it off.
See also: form, rare

rare bird

n. an unusual person; a person with rare talents or abilities. An interesting kind of rare bird is the man who can take long vacations and still make money.
See also: bird, rare

rare old time

n. a fine and enjoyable time at a party or something similar. (Folksy.) That was a rare old time at Tom’s the other night.
See also: old, rare, time

rare bird, a

An unusual phenomenon or person. The term is a translation from Juvenal’s Satires (ca. a.d. 120), in which, speaking of chastity, he writes, “Rara avis in terris nigroque simillima cygno” (A bird as rare upon the earth as a black swan). The term was soon being applied to other rare phenomena, often as sarcastically as Juvenal had used it, as, for example, for “an honest lawyer” (John Wesley, Journal, 1764).
See also: rare
References in periodicals archive ?
Chefs' perceptions of customers' preferences for rareness differed significantly from customer's true preferences: not only did chefs prefer to serve livers more rare than customers wanted them served, they also thought that customers wanted chicken livers more rare than the customers themselves indicated (p = 0.008, Kolmogorov-Smirnov 2-sample test).
The rareness of MCC accompanied by the lack of outcome reports as well as relative treatment inconsistence raises further barriers to general treatment recommendations.
He then uses this critique as a platform to delineate his theory that Shakespeare conceived of himself as a commercial dramatist working in a degraded medium who paradoxically assumed that he could achieve "rareness" and "glory" by "aspiring to seem `common' too" (xiii).
The received works will be judged according to some indices including the beauty and elegance of the structure, resistance of the structure, presentation of references and sufficient explanation about the model, and rareness and newness of the model (that is less known).
We present these different three cases of inappropriate TSH syndrome to emphasize its rareness and the importance of using tests for the differential diagnosis of inappropriate TSH syndrome.
The price is determined by the rareness, quality, and beauty of the beads.
The subdimension rareness represents the potential of valuation, and the valuation determines the effective valuation, as valued by costumer and by investor.
As I reflected on my good fortune, I celebrated the rareness of this hunt--everything had gone better than a dream.
'It contains the discourse of the whole world, which is at this day most beautiful; a thing of that singularity, curiousness, and rareness, that England hath not the like again.' This verdict on the great pavement, which lies before the high altar of Westminster Abbey, was delivered in 1636.
She reserves rareness for her venture into the new world of modern innovation in oriental school.
To its rareness, the temple possess six secret 'nilavara' A, B, C, D, E and F (vaults to keep the assets safely).
At the other end of the spectrum, most universities are not offering courses dealing with international business and VRIO (value, rareness, immutability and organization) analysis.
The value of gold is of course a result of its rareness and also of its interesting physical characteristics.
Egyptian words such as "obelisks," "Basilisks," "catafalque," and "Amenalk," among a plethora of others, with their oddness and rareness, are encrusted in the poetic space for their dazzling effect and not for their signification.