rare old time

rare old time

n. a fine and enjoyable time at a party or something similar. (Folksy.) That was a rare old time at Tom’s the other night.
See also: old, rare, time
References in periodicals archive ?
Accompanying Trinity hooker Billy Conway and prop forward John Thompson, both injured and therefore charged with the duty of doing the tackle counts, we sat in the midst of the Millom fans who were having a rare old time as their team made life undeniably hard for the city slickers from Wakefield.
My old mate Pasty Face had a rare old time on his recent Aussie jaunt
But staff needn't have worried because Bernard was having a rare old time - a sing-song on the ferry and making friends with other veterans.
IT HAS been tough going on some of the coarse fishing waters in the region but anglers fishing for trout at Packington Somers have generally been having a rare old time of things, with a rod average of nearly four fish per angler over the last week.
And all of them were having a rare old time, indicative of Mr Murs' universal appeal.
They went tearing about and had themselves a rare old time.
Politicians and pundits have been turning up on every channel, at all times of the day, and it's quite clear that they're having a rare old time to themselves.
We all laughed like drains and had a rare old time.
The Treasury Select committee is set to have a rare old time with the life companies' "inherited estates".
He came over a few years ago in 1999 to our 45th-year School reunion party at Pontardawe and we all had a rare old time reminiscing those days we had together in the '50s.
Felix had a rare old time sauntering about Glasgow and Edinburgh, probably poking in for a night out in Fat Sam's in Dundee and having a swally at Johnny Foxes in Inverness.
Her rise to fame - kick-started by an appearance on Later With Jools Holland culminated with the recent Brits where she seemed to be having a rare old time.
Meanwhile, sailors are having a rare old time on the island larking about.
There's no play area at Three Choirs, but my nephew Tom, five, and niece Orla, two, had a rare old time haring up and down the great grassy avenues between the vines.