rant against (someone or something)

(redirected from ranting against)

rant against (someone or something)

To complain angrily, forcefully, and at great length about someone or something. You should spend less time ranting against your professor and spend more time studying the material. I stop paying attention whenever he starts ranting against the government.
See also: rant

rant against someone or something

to rave and yell against someone or something. She spent most of the morning ranting against her mother-in-law. Leonard spent the entire morning ranting against the government.
See also: rant
References in periodicals archive ?
The legal counsel of Vice President Leni Robredo said that they are considering filing charges against blogger Drew Olivar, after a video of him cursing and ranting against Robredo went viral online.
By Kang Aa-young Audio that allegedly captures Korean Air heiress Heather Cho ranting against a worker has been revealed.
The development has come in around five days after Interior Minister, Chaudhry Nisar Ali Khan had directed the federal agency to detain the people who were ranting against the army on social media.
London, May 31 ( ANI ): Amanda Bynes is trying to make peace with Rihanna after ranting against her on Twitter.
COMEDIAN Alan Davies caused uproar last night after ranting against Liverpool's refusal to play on the 23rd anniversary of the Hillsborough Disaster.
AS A Labour supporter I found it pitiful to hear Cllr Joe Anderson ranting against Lib Dem Simon Hughes for labelling his cuts political (ECHO February 14).
The comments, made by Labour MP for Birkenhead Frank Field in a Sunday newspaper, accuse minister Ed Balls of ranting against faith schools.
So, Dan Bach, carry on ranting against all things Welsh language.
Achieving "Medicare for All" won't be easy, admitted the senator (though the wire services ignored this part): "Rightwing forces will unleash false attack ads ranting against socialized medicine and government-run health care."
Ranting against the political correctness of the Big Apple where you could no longer smoke, she came out with the immortal line that "New York is dead, I could die of boredom" - before falling out the window.
Buchloh has convincingly dissociated Hains and Villegle from Restany's hodgepodge and situated them in the wider sociopolitical context of postwar France (though in dose contact with the Internationale Situationisre, they refused to join, a refusal related to an anarchist reluctance with regard to a form of political militancy they had rightfully diagnosed as imitating the Surrealist model, despite Guy Debord's ranting against Andre Breton's stale officialdom).