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To a model-theoretician, this is the rankest heresy, and contradictions are to be eschewed as sentences that have no correspondence to reality.
By law, one cannot buy 'alcohol with food stamps, and the second claim is stereotype of the rankest kind.
Abu Shibl, the district of the city that had spawned the name, was the rankest, most corrupt in the entire country--and it almost touched upon the Jewish Quarter.
The point is one I've been muddling over ever since: many of the ideas and ideals that human beings now cherish most dearly were first received as the rankest of heresies, their proponents attacked, imprisoned, tortured, even killed.
It would appear, then, that for the libertarian who favors privatization to nevertheless utilize governmental amenities of this sort is the rankest of hypocrisy.
The second act of forgiveness, if we can even call it that, is spoken to a fully conscious Antonio, but is even more attenuated than the first and is preceded by the threat to "justify you traitors"</p> <pre> For you, most wicked sir, whom to call brother Would even infect my mouth, I do forgive Thy rankest fault--all of them--and require My dukedom of thee, which perforce I know Thou must restore.
Where before we were encouraged to visualize a highly anthropomorphic town mouse walking on hind legs and sporting a walking stick, now, in a mirroring tactic, Henryson seems at pains to remind us that these two are mice, running through coarse grass--'rankest gers and corne Vnder cowert' (ll.
property based on the rankest of hearsay and the flimsiest of
After all, determining what is true and false in political campaigns can be notoriously difficult (64) given that in politics, in the Court's own words, "the tenets of one man may seem the rankest error to his neighbor." (65) Accordingly, the question of whether a statement will be viewed as true or false, as fact or hyperbole, might depend largely on the perspective and/or the motivation of the decision maker.
Indeed the first over, bowled by Andrew Davies, was a maiden and when Wagh pulled the rankest of long-hops straight to the only man on the leg-side boundary and Ian Bell gloved a pull, it looked as if the visitors would struggle to set a testing target.
As a young man he had been "steeped in the rankest romantic literature of Germany," as he recalled later in life--but he was wise enough soon to be "acutely aware of the mischief done me." (2) The antidote was to go to graduate school, where More could study something difficult, otherworldly, and profound.
The NEA and its affiliates--like the Philadelphia Teachers Association (PTA)--concentrated on establishing and maintaining standards of teacher professionalism and considered the AFT's collective bargaining strategies and use of strikes in contract negotiations to be the "rankest unionism." (5) The AFT and the NEA competed against each other for membership and national prominence between the 1930s and the 1950s, but their rivalry intensified in the early 1960s as the two groups challenged each other in a number of collective bargaining elections for the right to represent teachers in individual local school districts.
"This amounts to the rankest form of racial profiling," said Adam Schwartz, a staff attorney for the American Civil Liberties Union of Illinois.
Indeed "conservatives could--and did--support Clarence Thomas's nomination to the Supreme Court for antiessentialist reasons," according to Valdes, Culp, and Harris, in that they "claimed that Thomas's black identity could be used to deessentialize the political image of black people, and argued that Thomas's opponents had an essentialist agenda in assuming that any 'true' black justice would be liberal, much less progressive." (53) Such logic can cast as "the rankest essentialism" (54) any claim whatsoever that race exists.
Writing exclusively for the Daily Post, Jonathan Margolis describes an article he wrote on the eve of James Bulger's funeral in 1993, as ``one of the rankest anti-Liverpool articles ever to emerge from Fleet Street''.