run the gamut

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run the gamut

To cover or extend across a wide and varied range. The tech company's products run the gamut from home appliances to computer modules for spacecraft.
See also: gamut, run
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

run the gamut

to cover a wide range [from one thing to another]. She wants to buy the house, but her requests run the gamut from expensive new carpeting to completely new landscaping. His hobbies run the gamut from piano repair to portrait painting.
See also: gamut, run
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

run the gamut

Extend over an entire range, as in His music runs the gamut from rock to classical. This expression alludes to the medieval musical scale of Guido d'Arezzo, gamut being a contraction of gamma and ut, the lowest and highest notes respectively. [Mid-1800s]
See also: gamut, run
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

run the gamut

experience, display, or perform the complete range of something.
Gamut is a contraction of medieval Latin gamma ut, gamma being the lowest note in the medieval musical scale and ut the first of the six notes forming a hexachord. Together, therefore, they represent the full range of notes of which a voice or an instrument is capable.
1996 Europe: Rough Guide Russia's hotels run the gamut from opulent citadels run as joint-ventures with foreign firms to seedy pits inhabited by mobsters.
See also: gamut, run
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

run the gamut, to

To extend over the entire range. The word gamut comes from Guido of Arezzo’s scale, a contraction of gamma, representing the lowest note of the medieval scale, G, and ut, the first note in any given scale (later called do). Acid-tongued Dorothy Parker was quoted as saying of actress Katharine Hepburn’s stage performance in The Lake (1933), “She runs the gamut of emotions from A to B”—that is, a very limited range of emotions.
See also: run, to
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Her ambient early installations ran the gamut from obscene jokes scrawled on gallery walls to WPA-size murals of quasi-official female empowerment.
The patients' psychiatric diagnoses ran the gamut, including conduct disorder, schizophrenia, severe depression, drug abuse and hyperactivity
Though the recommendations ran the gamut, the one unifying message from every speaker was that the DOB status quo must change.
In each dance, de Luis displayed an emotional range and technical skill that ran the gamut from utter abandon to complete control.
These souvenirs from far-flung psychic galaxies ran the gamut from tweaked cartoon pastiche, to eerie images of mutating snakes and armless, legless figures mummified in gold lame, to faux Color Field paintings, to objects that looked like they'd been lifted from a fun house.
Their comments ran the gamut from cautiously hopeful to downright dreary, and once during the event--titled "New York Area Real Estate: A Region at the Crossroad"--two panelists verbally sparred over interpretations of the post-Sept.
Equated by the curators with "gesture and form," the restlessness evoked in the show's title ran the gamut from Vanessa Beecroft's bevy of beige-clad models, suppressing yawns and fidgets, in her Piano Americano, 1995, to Phyllis Baldino's collection of manically brief narratives, In the Present, 1996.