ram (something) down

(redirected from rams down)

ram (something) down

1. To force something down into or through something else. He tried ramming a stick down the pipe to clear the blockage, but it ended up getting stuck in there. Don't ram the plug into the socket like that—you could electrocute yourself! The government has come under fire for ordering prison staff to ram food down the hunger strikers' throats.
2. To cram or pack something down by pounding it forcefully. No matter how hard I ram these clothes down, I just can't get the suitcase to close shut. Don't ram the soil down like that, or the seed won't be able to sprout properly.
3. To force something to topple over by pounding into it. Police were forced to ram the suspect's door down after he refused to cooperate. We'll have to ram this part of the wall down with the bulldozer.
4. To force, compel, or attempt to make someone accept, endure, consider, or agree with or to something. Always followed by "(one's) throat." I hate going to my friend's house because his husband's always ramming political rhetoric down my throat. Look, I'm just browsing around for a car, quit trying to ram one down my throat!
See also: down, ram

ram something down

to pack something down by pounding, as with a ram. The worker used a pole to ram the earth down and pack it tight. The worker rammed down the earth.
See also: down, ram

ram down

v.
1. To break something down by pounding with or as if with a ram: The attacking army rammed down the fortress wall using a huge log. The truck rammed the tree down.
2. To force the passage or acceptance of something into something: The plumber rammed the plunger down the pipe.
See also: down, ram
References in classic literature ?
She rams down about three times the regular load of powder, takes aim at a big buck that's pretty busy at the torturin', an' bangs away.
The media machine continually rams down our throats how wonderful this city is and tells us that we are a huge tourist hub.
And, with the Rams down to 10 men, Steve Howard went on to win it with a super strike in added time.
Thunder were tenacious in the tackle and were quick to close the lofty Rams down and force errors, but were once again unable to turn pressure into points.
In the quasi-Beckettian text that accompanies Doppelt's photographs--the flow of language is ratcheted up to the point of delirium--Suzanne's mother speaks in a schizoid register of the food she rams down her daughter's throat.